Courses

Course

This course is a continuation of Accounting 240, Intermediate Accounting I. It covers Long-Lived Assets, Long-Term Liabilities, Stockholders' Equity, Financial Statement Preparation and Analysis.

Previous accounting knowledge is not required. The course covers the entire accounting cycle from analysis of transactions, journalizing, posting, worksheets, preparation of financial statements, closing entries, post-closing trail balance and reversing entries. Also introduced are the accounting principles as applied in the United States (GAAP). Emphasis is placed on practical applications of accounting procedures as well as conceptual comprehension of accounting principles used in both service- and product-related businesses. Led by faculty, lab hours are used to reinforce topics covered in lecture. Students also participate in group work and complete projects.

An introduction to the construction and implementation of computerized accounting systems used to accurately document, record and summarize financial information. The course emphasizes how such systems safeguard the assets of the client and ensure the integrity of the reporting system. Students will use source documents as a means of developing an information base. Students will design special journals and voucher systems as a means of facilitating recording functions and they will also develop a subsidiary ledger for purposes of recording secondary information. The course will conclude with students operating a fully-integrated computerized general ledger system that may be applied to the accounting needs of individuals, organizations and small business enterprises. Students will also independently complete computer laboratory projects using specialized computer software.

Continuation of Principles of Accounting I, emphasizing accounting applications for partnerships, corporations, and manufacturing. A survey of cost accounting and budgetary procedures including the preparation and use of financial information needed for management planning and decision-making. Led by faculty, lab hours are used to reinforce topics covered in lecture. Students also participate in group work and complete projects.

A study of Federal Income Tax law and its practical application in the preparation of tax forms for the individual, partnerships, and corporations.

Auditing3 Credits

This course will cover the theory of auditing principles and standards employed by the external and internal auditor. These standards are based on generally- accepted auditing standards and the related literature of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Emphasis is on Auditing procedures.

Examines cost accounting information systems; cost of materials, labor and manufacturing expenses, standards, and cost controls; direct costing and cost analysis.

This course presents a balanced approach to the treatment of conceptual and procedural problems in accounting. The course explains the rationale behind business transactions and addresses the accounting and reporting of those transactions. The course will include discussions of the latest developments in the accounting profession and practice.

This course is an introduction to materials science. Topics include physical and mechanical properties of materials including metal alloys, plastics, rubbers, ceramics, glass, and composites. Students learn standard techniques for measuring mechanical properties including American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D638 Tensile Test, ASTM D2240 Hardness Test, ASTM D5630 Ash Test, ASTM D3418 Melting Point and Crystallization Point Test, ASTM D256 Impact TEST and ASTM D648 Heat Deflection Test. Hands-on laboratory sessions reinforce topics covered during lecture.

Catalog Course Description: This course covers the basic processing methods for metals and woods. Topics include hand tools and power tools, machining, joining, shaping, bending, surface preparation and finishing, Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) and blueprint.

This course provides an introductory overview to the field of American Studies. It seeks to answer the question, ?What does it mean to be an American?? It integrates several disciplines, taking a holistic view of the American perspective. The goal is to introduce students to the ideas and theories most closely linked to the field. These include topics in American history, philosophy, cultural studies, art, literature, political science and international relations.

This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of the nature and functions of human culture. The course examines how different cultures respond to certain needs expressed by religion, art, social organization and general patterns of life. The cultural diversity of humankind is emphasized.

In this course, students examine evidence for the origin and evolution of humankind from our earliest ancestors to modern populations. This course incorporates theories and data from a host of anthropological, biological and archaeological expertise and seeks to explain how and why human beings developed and adapted all over the world.

This course provides an introductory level exploration of the Macintosh Operating System; print, interactive and time-based graphics applications; typography; and color theory for print, web and video. Students will also learn conceptual, historical, and theoretical aspects of art and design made with digital media. 3 hours lecture/1 hour lab

This course provides students with the necessary knowledge and techniques for the creation and manipulation of photographic digital images using digital cameras and scanners for input, Photoshop for editing and manipulation, and photo quality inkjet printers for output. Assignments and discussions address critical issues in contemporary digital practices.

The course provides students with the foundation knowledge of the technical and creative aspects of digital three-dimensional design that will allow students to conceive, edit and fabricate objects using 3D scanners, 3D modeling software and 3D printers.

This course will provide students with the necessary technical, conceptual and aesthetic knowledge to create effective designs for print that comprehensively communicate ideas through visual graphic form. Preparation of photos, graphics and text for use in layout and design will be thoroughly addressed. The use of typography and its integration with images to communicate specific ideas and content to a desired audience will also be a main focus of the course. Adobe InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop software applications will be utilized.

This course will provide students with the necessary conceptual knowledge of the visual aesthetics of interactive design. Students will design websites that use intuitive visual layouts and interactivity to communicate information and ideas to a specific audience. The course also covers the basic technical skills required to prepare images and content for the web. The Adobe Dreamweaver software application will be utilized in this course.

Through lectures, demonstrations and project-based assignments, students will acquire knowledge of digital video preproduction, production and postproduction by studying treatment and storyboard design, lighting techniques, shot composition using high-definition video cameras, editing video and sound, creating title sequences, compositing video, compressing data, and publishing digital video. Industry standard desktop video and audio editing software applications will be utilized. This course will also examine the role digital video and moving images have played in contemporary art, documentation, and mass media. Equipment will be supplied.

This course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills to create dynamic two-dimensional digital animation and motion graphics. Students will acquire the analytical and critical thinking skills required to conceive, produce and publish original digital animations utilizing industry standard software applications. Students will use storyboarding, rotoscoping, animated typography, original character development and scene production techniques. 2D animation fundamentals as well as concepts of motion and continuity will be thoroughly covered in this course. This course will also briefly introduce 3D compositing and interactivity. Equipment will be supplied.

Computer Arts Portfolio and Presentation provides student artists and designers with the knowledge to meet both their educational and professional goals. Students will prepare their work to be presented to both future clients and employers as well as for admission to senior academic institutions. Students will acquire conceptual knowledge and technical skills to effectively present their work in many formats including as a printed portfolio, a web-based portfolio, a video reel for animation and video works, an interactive video disk, in an exhibition setting and as a multimedia presentation to an audience. The course will culminate with an exhibition and presentation of students? work. Computer Arts Portfolio and Presentation is the Capstone course for the A.F.A. Studio Arts ? Computer Arts Option.

Art History II traces the development and evolution of techniques and styles from the 15th to the 20th century. This course will cover major movements of art including the Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Post Impressionism, Dada, Surrealism, and Modernism. Students follow art into the twenty first-century, and view how social, technological, and spiritual changes affected its development.

Two-dimensional design introduces the organization of visual elements on a two-dimensional plane. The elements of art and concepts of design such as composition, perspective, color and other art elements will be examined through lectures, demonstrations and related studio problems for the students to explore and solve. Techniques for handling materials will be developed.

Drawing I3 Credits

This is an introductory course in basic drawing skills. Emphasis is on drawing from direct observation or life with a variety of traditional drawing materials and techniques. It includes an introduction to various systems of drawing - e.g., linear perspective and principles of chiaroscuro.

Painting I3 Credits

This course is an introductory studio (laboratory) course in basic painting skills and techniques. Focus will be upon the use of paint to create fine art and explore individual creative potential. Emphasis will be on control and proficiency in handling the medium of paint and learning the fundamental painting techniques. This course is designed for beginners with little or no experience of painting. Proficiency in drawing is beneficial but not critical to successful completion of the course.

Student artists will learn to create practical and theoretical three- dimensional objects using a variety of techniques and materials. Through the study of nature and geometry, students will learn to use line, plane, mass, volume and surface.

Color theory teaches student artists how color affects the human brain, psyche, emotion and eye. Through lecture, multimedia presentation, and hands-on studio assignments, they learn how color functions with light, computers, and pigment.

Introduction to Gallery Management introduces students to the hybrid nature of arts-related careers including museum education, curatorship, arts administration, and operating commercial galleries. Students gain first hand experience in the day-to-day gallery experience working in the Benjamin J. Dineen, III and Dennis C. Attachment II Hull Gallery and demonstrate the scholarship, production and marketing skills necessary for the successful creation of an art exhibition and/or sustained gallery program. The material covered in Introduction to Gallery Management provides students with a general model of how art galleries function as cultural institutions that collect, display and interpret art and objects. Topics include the history of art display and art exhibition education and students explore curatorial practice within the vast range of gallery and museum exhibition spaces. The course provides practical experience for students interested in pursuing a career in the visual arts. As students engage with the course material they also develop and enhance their skills in visual and verbal literacy, self-expression, creative problem solving, writing, and critical thinking. The course material is complemented by field trips to museums and galleries in New York and New Jersey. Students will complete independent work as a docent at the Benjamin J. Dineen, III and Dennis C. Hull Gallery for twelve hours over the course of the semester.

Art History Part I traces the development of art from prehistory through the early Renaissance. The course surveys the major developments in painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics and architecture through the western canon and provides an introduction to the art of Africa, the Near East, South and Southeast Asia, China and Japan.

Drawing II3 Credits

A continuation of Drawing I, this course will focus on individual development, a thorough understanding of drawing principles and further the use of drawing materials and techniques. Students are responsible for the purchase of their own supplies.

ART 220 is a co-requisite course to ART 130 and ARC 280 enables students to identify and research major trends in visual arts and their cultural and historical context through first-hand experience. Students develop a deeper understanding of the contemporary art world through increased engagement and familiarity with various New York and New Jersey art institutions. Students visit museums, galleries, art fairs, artist and design studios, auction houses, conservation studios and attend artist lectures to experience and better understand contemporary art and the structure of the contemporary art world.

Painting II3 Credits

A continuation of Painting I, this course is an advanced studio painting class stressing individual painting skills and personal style. Painting II focuses on compositional theories and practice, experimentation with mediums, and creative approaches to subjects. Students are responsible for the purchase of their own supplies.

Portfolio and Presentation will provide student artists with the knowledge and skills to meet both their educational and professional goals. First, student artists will develop a physical and digital portfolio showcasing their best works created at HCCC. This will allow students to seamlessly enter the third year of any four-year art program. Second, student artists will learn to market themselves to clients, museums, and galleries. A resume, artists statement, PowerPoint presentation, slide packet and web site will be produced. New technologies will be stressed along with traditional (non-digital) methods to prepare the student for the professional art world.

Survey of Contemporary Art examines the development of the formal and conceptual concerns that have shaped 21st Century art. Distinguished by the absence of a uniform organizing principle or label, contemporary art is a diverse and eclectic combination of subjects, concepts, materials, and methods. Students explore the notion of what art is and how it can be made through the consideration of ideas, practices and concepts that are unique to our contemporary world.

Water Color3 Credits

In this course, students will learn through demonstration and experience how to paint using the medium of watercolor. Students will create still life, landscape (out of doors, weather-permitting), figurative, and abstract paintings. Students who successfully complete this course will possess a basic painting kit, a portfolio of watercolor paintings, and the fundamental knowledge and basic skills needed to effectively use the medium.

This course is designed as an introduction to the Studio Arts for non-art majors. Students will learn through the basic theories and practices of Art History, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, and Sculpture.

Student artists will learn to draw the nude and clothed male and female form. Emphasis is placed on scale, proportion, anatomy, expression and appreciation of the figure.

ASL 101 is an introductory course to American Sign Language as it is used within the American Deaf community, as well as an introduction to Deaf Culture and history. The class will emphasize non-verbal communication as students learn basic vocabulary, sentence structure, facial expressions, signing parameters and other grammatical markers. Students will start to build basic expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language that will be reinforced by a variety of activities.

ASL 102 is a second level course in American Sign Language as it is used within the American Deaf community, as well as a continuation of discussion of Deaf Culture and history. The class will emphasize non-verbal communication as students continue to build their sign vocabulary, sentence-structure, facial expression, and other grammatical markers. Students will continue to strengthen their expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language as they engage in conversations that will be reinforced by a variety of activities. Content from ASL 101 will be continually reviewed and built on in this course.

This course is a study of the mechanisms occurring within the cell. It is an overview of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells. It reviews in depth the organization of the cell plasma membrane and organelles. The physiology of each cell component is further detailed.

This Course is designed to give students a comprehensive understanding of the function and structure of nucleic acids and proteins in cells. Students learn various cell signaling pathways including protein transport, protein activation, apoptosis, and cell cycle control in both Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells. Students also learn various Molecular Biology laboratory techniques including gene expression, recombinant DNA technology, Chromosome mapping, Protein and RNA extraction. Attachment

This is an introductory course in contemporary biology designed to provide a foundation for further studies in biology. Instructional techniques include lectures, demonstrations and laboratory.

This course focuses on an understanding of the biological functioning of humans. Additional emphasis is given to genetics, ecology and microbiology. Laboratories include hands-on exercises and lab dissections.

This course examines the structure and physiological processes of the human body and provides a background for understanding health problems, diagnosis, and treatment.

This course is a continuation of Principles of Biology I. Students will study the structure, function, and behavior of organisms and the unity and diversity of life. They will learn about biological organisms and processes and how to correlate new biological concepts with the ones previously learned. Laboratory exercises will encourage students to practice science through hands-on experiments.

This course stresses the application of nutritional principles to daily health maintenance and conditions that require special diet management. It is designed for Nursing and Health-related or Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management programs.

Ecology4 Credits

In this course, students will understand the mechanisms governing the structure and function of ecological systems, particularly the relationship between organisms and the environment. Students will investigate key environment issues such as; global climate change, acid deposition, loss of biodiversity and genetically modified food.

This course is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Students will become acquainted with the basic functions, complexities, and inter-relationships of the components of the human body. Topics will include the circulatory, endocrine, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Lectures are supplemented by laboratory sessions which will include dissection and elementary physiologic experiments.

Histology4 Credits

In this course, students will recognize the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organs at the microscopic level. They will identify and recognize all of the major cell and tissue types of the human body. Histology is a laboratory course and lectures often take the form of slide demonstrations. The lab and lecture will be combined into a single learning experience.

This course is geared for individuals entering the medical or health sciences professions. It will encompass a survey of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria and applications of microbiology. The laboratory sessions will stress isolation, cultivation, and various biochemical and identification techniques of selected bacteria and other microorganisms.

Genetics4 Credits

This course examines the principles of inheritance and gene action, from the molecular to the organism level, and populations. Topics include Mendelian principles, molecular genetics, genetic mapping, population generics, quantitative genetics, gene regulation, mutations, repair mechanisms, and the modern genetic manipulation.

This non-lab science course is designed for liberal arts and other non-science majors. It gives students the opportunity to discover and understand the major biological aspects of human sexuality. It focuses on the anatomical and physiological study of the reproductive system, conception process, pregnancy period, prenatal development and delivery stages, sexual maturation, gender distinctiveness, and the infectious maladies and specific medical conditions associated with human sexuality. Video simulations in selected topic are incorporated to reinforce scientific exploration and formulation.

Biology is a vast subject that explores all of life, from molecules to ecosystems. Students will acquire a framework of key biological concepts into which they can fit the many new things they will learn. They will become familiar with the scientific process, in particular, the posing and testing of hypotheses, and the scientific study of life, evolution, ecology, plants, and animal forms and functions. Laboratory exercises will encourage students to practice science through hands-on experiments.

This Course is designed to give students a comprehensive understanding of the function and structure of nucleic acids and proteins in cells. Students learn various cell signaling pathways including protein transport, protein activation, apoptosis, and cell cycle control in both Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells. Students also learn various Molecular Biology laboratory techniques including gene expression, recombinant DNA technology, Chromosome mapping, Protein and RNA extraction. Attachment

This is an introductory course in contemporary business practices. Students develop a basic understanding of key functional areas of business including management, marketing, finance, economics, accounting and technology. The course focuses on current dynamic issues facing business such as globalization, entrepreneurship, ethical reasoning and the legal/regulatory environment.

The course provides a broad overview of international/global Business highlighting the opportunities and challenges multinational organizations face in today's dynamic environment. Students are introduced to the cultural, economic, political, competitive and legal environments in which international/global businesses operate.

This course provides the student with on-the-job business experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised practical experience working in a setting related to the student's area of business interest. Students must successfully complete 225 hours of practical experience in an approved business workplace. There is an additional lecture component for students to share their experience and discuss lessons learned.

Provides a basic knowledge of business law covering the nature, structure and processes of our legal systems and the laws involving constitutional law, contracts, intellectual property, torts, and product liability. The case study approach will be used extensively, and the ethical issues in the business environment will also be addressed throughout the course.

This course introduces students to the principles of conduct and employment in the food service industry, coupled with sanitation concepts in the operation of a food service establishment. Professionalism, ethics, conduct, and employment opportunities during and after completion of a degree are discussed. Personal hygiene, fire safety regulations, including state and federal laws pertaining to the handling of food products are studied. This course prepares students for a nationally recognized ServSafe certification exam provided by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF)

An introduction to the various types of table service styles and settings, including American, French, Russian, banquet, and family style. Emphasis is placed in proper dining room preparations, customer relations, placing and retrieving orders, clearing of tables, and securing the dining room. Students will also be exposed to the role of the dining room in the overall business plan of the restaurant business. The course also covers an introduction of wines and wine making.

This course is intended to provide a strong foundation in the basic fundamentals of commercial food preparation and practices. Proper knife skills and the use and care of tools and equipment is demonstrated and practiced in the laboratory. Emphasis is placed with students using hands-on experience in food production utilizing designed introductory menus. The hands-on experience is supported with demonstrations and lecture in the laboratory. Students will learn the appropriate cooking methods that may be applied to meats, fish, poultry, starches, and vegetables. The basic cooking methods are introduced and practiced in the laboratory. Students will also learn the proper techniques used in the preparation of stocks, soups, and sauces.

An introduction to the basic and advanced level of breakfast cookery, including basic egg preparations, breakfast meats, potatoes, quick breads, batters, various breakfast items, farinaceous and hot and cold cereals. Students will experience short order cooking, and will gain knowledge of time and temperature in the preparation of various breakfast items. Skills and techniques will be developed in the preparation of meat products, such as sausage-making, and in the preparation of other breakfast meats. Ethnic and multicultural breakfast foods will be explored, as well as creative and modern breakfast alternatives. This course also serves as an introduction to the preparation of various salads, including simple, composed, bound, and hot/cold combinations. Emphasis will be on the preparation of dressings, dips, spreads, classical and modern sandwich-making, identification and use of salad greens, and fruit preparations.

Bakeshop I2 Credits

An introduction to the preparation of basic quick breads, rolls, breakfast items, and basic desserts, including various icings and butter cream, puddings, cakes, cookies, and pies. Students will gain skills in the preparation of pie crusts, pie washes, and pie fillings. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding and use of ingredients, weights and measures, tools, and equipment used in the bakeshop.

An extension and reinforcement of the skills practiced in Table Service I. Emphasis is placed on knowledge of the menu, suggestive selling techniques, napkin folding, and the use of wines and spirits in the restaurant business. Banquet service will be performed through a designed and scheduled buffet.

This is a course designed to provide the student with on-the-job food service experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised practical experience working in a variety of food-service settings related to the student?s area of interest. Students must successfully complete 150 hours of practical experience in an approved food-service establishment.

A continuation and reinforcement of the concepts and practices of Production Kitchen Skills I. This course exposes the students to more advanced techniques and applications utilizing different cooking methods. Students will be exposed to a variety of seafood items, as well as commercial meat cuts used for beef, lamb, veal, pork and poultry.

This course exposes students to the preparation of brunch items, fish and shellfish, hot and cold hors d oeuvres, cold canapes, cold plated entrees, and specialty sandwiches as well as the design of salad bar setups. Basic forcemeat preparations used for pates, galantines, terrines, and spreads are practiced in the laboratory. This course also includes the preparations of basic cheese-making, relishes, condiments and chutneys, including jams and jellies. Students will also prepare various entree salads.

Bakeshop II2 Credits

This course is an extension and reinforcement of the concepts and practices of Bakeshop I. Students will be exposed to a variety of designed menus to strengthen their skills in the preparation of baked goods. They will also learn how to utilize leftover baked goods to prepare various products. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of various cake batters and icings.

The student will gain knowledge of the overall operation of a restaurant, including the training of various techniques and styles of service. Emphasis will be placed on the study of wines from various regions, and the art of pairing wine with food. Hands-on beverage service and mixology are practiced in the laboratory. French culinary terminology will be integrated.

Students will become familiar with the characteristics of various national cuisines, as well as the global interaction of cooking techniques, equipment and ingredients affecting the modern professional kitchen. Students will prepare a variety of international soups, sauces, vegetables, starches and entrees from various regions around the world, as well as gaining an understanding of dietary guidelines and dining habits of numerous regions of the world.

An introduction to the preparation of vegetable and fruit carvings, ice sculpturing, aspics, chaud-froid, and timbales through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experience. Emphasis will be placed on the proper techniques of garde manger preparations, terminology, departmental structure and design, and the use of various equipment and tools. Students are also introduced to the preparation of marinades, mousses, pickling, canning, pates, forcemeats, galantines, sausages and charcuterie. The techniques, terminology, planning and design of buffets are also learned and practiced.

Students are introduced to advanced pastries, classical desserts, and cake decorations. They will learn various mixing methods, the preparation of mousses, and advanced piping techniques with an overall emphasis on plate presentation.

This course examines the techniques, methodologies and procedures involved in the successful operation of a restaurant. Students will develop skills in the tableside preparation and service of appetizers, entrees, salads, and desserts. This course will include the perspective on meeting customer expectations, and the importance of the interaction with guests. The student will gain practical knowledge of structuring a banquet, and the ability to design and coordinate a buffet. French culinary terminology will be emphasized.

This is a course designed to provide the student with on-the-job food service experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised practical experience working in a variety of food service settings related to the student?s area of interest. Students must successfully complete 300 hours of practical experience in an approved food-service establishment.

Students will gain an understanding of the historical importance and effect of classical French cuisine on cooking in the 21st century. Emphasis will be placed on the preparation of classical soups, sauces, vegetables, starches, and entrees. In addition, students will examine contemporary interpretations of traditional dishes and how variations can be introduced and executed in kitchens across each segment of the foodservice industry.

This course is structured to provide the student with theoretical and practical experiences in advanced garde manger. Students will also be introduced to salt sculpturing, cold sauces and dressings, curing and smoking of foods, sushi and sashimi preparations, international appetizers and hors d?oeuvres, and cheese identification and presentation. Emphasis will be placed on the planning, preparation, design, and set-up of cold food preparations for a buffet. They will also be introduced to tallow and shortening sculpturing, platter garnishes, and decorative show platters. Lectures will include off-premise catering, food show rules and regulations, food presentation and platter arrangement.

Students will be introduced to classical showpiece mediums, such as nougat, pastillage, chocolate work and advanced cake preparations. The course will focus on the various techniques needed to produce these mediums, along with learning how to prepare a classical dessert buffet.

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the methods, tools, and procedures used to control food, beverage, and labor costs in a food service organization. Emphasis is placed on each step in the flow of costs: purchasing, receiving, storage, issuing, preparation, portioning, service and accounting for sales. Labor costs as they relate to the operation are discussed. Active problem-solving and practical applications are used in class. Basic computer applications of cost-control systems will be introduced. Applied problems in the hospitality industry will also be included.

This course brings together the four most important foundations in foodservice purchasing: market and distribution systems, storeroom operations, cost controls, and product identification. In addition, this course covers current issues like security, legal and regulatory compliance, sustainable agriculture, aquaculture and genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of menu development as well as the procedure for designing and building a foodservice operation. Strong emphasis is given to the consequential interrelationship between the two and is substantiated through cogent explanation and demonstration. Students develop basic menus for a variety of meal periods based on a learned systemization. The course examines the tried and true process for designing, building and commissioning a restaurant including space allocation, work and product flow, facilities engineering, equipment selection and energy practices.

This is a course designed to provide the student with on-the-job food service experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised practical experience working in a variety of food service settings related to the student?s area of interest. Students must successfully complete 150 hours of practical experience in an approved food service establishment.

Students will learn how to work with an ice cream machine to create basic frozen desserts, such as sorbets, sherbets, ice creams, and Italian ices. Techniques to produce meringues and their various applications will be taught. An introduction of hot and cold souffles completes the course. Prerequisite: CBP 124

This class is designed for students to have an understanding of a different career option available in the pastry arts. The class is divided into two distinct styles of desserts. The first half of the class will be devoted to learning restaurant and cafe style pastries along with the art of plating. The second half of the course will cover the mass production aspect of the pastry industry. The focus will be on in-store retail/bakery style desserts using pre-mixes. Prerequisite: CBP 211

The art of working with chocolate, candy making, and petits fours is the emphasis of this class. Students learn chocolate tempering, and will be able to apply it to create a wide variety of truffles, molded candies and decorations. Students produce popular candies using knowledge gained in Introduction to Professional Baking. The course also covers the production of mignardise, petits fours, such as sec and glace.

Students use classical and current techniques to create a Chocolate, Sugar and Pastillage showpiece. Students learn the elements of planning, designing and assembling a competition caliper showpiece of their own design. Through multiple techniques inclusive of template making, casting, sculpting, blowing, pulling, and decorating, students will create a multiple medium showpiece.

The Advanced Bread Baking class is designed for bakers seeking to further their technical knowledge and to refine their hands-on skills in the art of making artisanal bread. The course offers a complex and detailed examination of the bread baker's art. Content material focuses extensively on the creation and use of sprouted, whole, and heirloom, flours in the maintenance of sourdough and levain cultures, as well as the production of sourdough bread using ancient grains. Students produce various breads of both contemporary and ancient origin. Hands-on time is also devoted to the creation of a decorative bread display. A key focus is on naturally leavened breads that use ancient grains.

This course introduces the basic principles and techniques used in bread baking and pastry arts. It covers: Product identification, proper use of equipment, measurements, baking terminology along with food costing and storeroom procedures, and demonstrations of mixing methods for yeast raised breads, cakes, custards, chocolate, sugar and creams are included. Prerequisites: CAI 113, CAI 114, CAI 117, CAI 118, CAI 119

Emphasis will be on various bread mixing methods and their characteristics. Students will learn the relationship between mixing and fermentation. The understanding of gluten and its importance in the bakeshop will be a key component to the lab. Lean and rich doughs will be produced using hands-on techniques. Also the craft of artisan breads will be taught using a diversity of pre-ferments and sponges showing their advantages and disadvantages. Pre-requisite: CAI 119 Co-requisite: CBP 120

Students will utilize cake mixing methods to create traditional and nontraditional desserts. The use of timeless fillings and icings such as ganache and Bavarian cream will culminate with the student creating classical desserts such as Linzer Torte, Sacher Torte and Gateau St. Honore. The ever popular cupcake will also be produced showing its versatility in today's market. Prerequisite: CAI 129 and CBP 122; Co-requisite: CBP 120

This course introduces students to the Child Development Associate Credentialing process and provides comprehensive instruction in early childhood education/child development. Students will begin development of a Professional Portfolio and practice strategies for observing and recording children's behavior. At the conclusion, students will have satisfied 60 hours of the 120 hours of formal training, covering the six Competency Standards required by the Council for Professional Recognition, which issues the CDA to qualified candidates. Students are expected to be employed, or to volunteer, either full or part-time, in an Early Head Start program or a child care center, with children between the ages of birth through 36 months. The course may be applied to the Early Childhood Education programs as a substitute for ECE 201, Introduction to Early Childhood Education.

This course helps students expand their knowledge of the Child Development Associate credentialing process and provides comprehensive instruction in early childhood education/child development. Students will develop skills in planning curriculum for infants and toddlers and complete the Professional Portfolio. The course offers 60 contact hours of formal training covering the six Competency Standards as required by The Council for Professional Recognition. Combined with CDI 100, Infant/Toddler CDA Workshop I, students will satisfy the 120 contact hours of formal training, as required by the CDA National Credentialing System. Students are expected to be employed, or to volunteer, either full- or part-time, in an Early Head Start program or a child care center, with children between the ages of birth through 36 months. The course can be applied to the Early Childhood Education programs as a substitute for ECE 230, Infant/Toddler Curriculum. Prerequisite: CDI 100; Co-requisite: CDI 120

Students will be expected to self-place in a licensed Infant/Toddler center, an Early Head Start program or may be observed in their place of employment. All students will meet once a week for 50 minutes of class time, as well. These 120 hours may be applied to the 480 hours necessary to apply for the Infant/Toddler CDA Credential. Prerequisite: CDI 100; Co-requisite: CDI 110

This course introduces students to the Child Development Associate Credentialing process and provides comprehensive instruction in early childhood education/child development. Students will begin development of a professional resource file and practice strategies for observing and recording children's behavior. At the conclusion, students will have satisfied 60 hours of the 120 hours of formal training required by the CDA National Credentialing Program. Students are expected to be employed, or to volunteer, either full or part-time, in a child care center, preschool, or pre-kindergarten program with children between the ages of 3 and 5. The course may be applied to the Early Childhood Education programs as a substitute for ECE 201, Introduction to Early Childhood Education.

This course helps students expand their knowledge of the Child Development Associate credentialing process and provides comprehensive instruction in early childhood education/child development. Students will develop skills in planning curriculum for preschoolers and complete their professional resource file. The course offers 60 contact hours of formal training. Combined with CDP 100, Preschool CDA Workshop I, students will satisfy the 120 contact hours of formal training, as required by the CDA National Credentialing System. Students are expected to be employed, or to volunteer, either full- or part-time, in a child care center, preschool or pre-kindergarten program, with children between the ages of 3 and 5. The course can be applied to the Early Childhood Education programs as a substitute for ECE 211, Early Childhood Curriculum. Prerequisite: CDP 100; Co-requisite: CDP 120

Students will be expected to self-place in a licensed preschool center, a Head Start program, or may be observed in their place of employment. All students will meet once a week for 50 minutes of class time, as well. These 120 hours may be applied to the 480 hours necessary to apply for the Preschool CDA Credential. Prerequisite: CDP 100; Co-requisite: CDP 110

This course explores the earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere from a chemical perspective, and investigates the chemical composition and reactions that characterize the earth's systems. Chemical processes in each of these spheres are used to illustrate and explain fundamental chemical concepts. Other topics include ozone depletion, acid rain, radiochemical dating, and global climate change.

Students study pollutants in air, water and solid waste, as well as their sources, lifetimes, spread, and toxicity to human health. The explanation is based on chemical reactions, mechanisms rate, and some physiology. Laboratory work introduces experiments pertinent to the lecture subjects, using micro-scale chemical analysis, instrumental analysis, and computer-interface.

This course is designed for students who have not had high school chemistry and for those who wish to review the subject. The course emphasizes descriptive chemistry. Topics include measurements and units, the periodic table, the atom, nuclear radioactivity, bond formation, simple stoichiometry, acid-base, redox, and organic compounds. The associate laboratory involves common measurement techniques and illustrates the lecture materials presented.

This course is an introduction to common physical and chemical properties of substances and solutions. Topics cover scientific measurements and SI units, atomic structure and the periodic table, inorganic nomenclature, gas laws, chemical stoichiometry, chemical bonding, molecular geometry and polarity, thermochemistry, liquid properties, cubic crystals, and solutions. Laboratory work illustrates common lab techniques as well as chemical principles.

This course is a continuation of College Chemistry I and an introduction to physicochemical concepts. Topics cover reaction rate, chemical equilibria, precipitation, acid-base, complexion, redox, electrochemistry, nuclear reactions and thermodynamic quantities. Laboratory work introduces experiments pertinent to lecture subjects and consists of semiqualitative analysis.

This is the first of a two-course sequence of introductory organic chemistry. The physical and chemical properties of organic compounds, including aliphatics, alicyclics, and aromatics are studied through an examination of their structure, preparation, reactivity, and spectral properties. The study of organic functionality centers in the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. The laboratory component includes separation and purification techniques and other synthetic procedures.

This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I. The studies proceed to aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their functional derivatives, amines, phenols and arylhalides. Emphasis is placed on group functionality and reaction mechanisms. Laboratory work illustrates organic synthesis, reactions, chemical analysis, and spectroscopic identification.

This is a preparatory class for the students who intend to pursue a career in Construction Management or in the field of Civil Engineering. The course develops an understanding of the science and mathematics involved in engineering. Students learn to perform mathematical calculations used in construction and project management. Students analyze physical laws and how to apply that analysis in engineering fields.

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of structural analysis and design for buildings, bridges and other structures. Students investigate the behavior of structural systems and elements through design exercises, case studies, and load testing of models. Students design structures using timber, masonry, steel, and concrete and gain an appreciation of structural design, with an emphasis on environmental impact associated with large scale construction.

Students learn the processes, techniques and procedures involved in a construction project from conception to completion. The course provides an opportunity to learn about common construction methods and materials involved. Students also learn technical skills involving in the areas of cost control, scheduling, risk analysis, delay analysis, administrative procedures, safety regulations, labor relations, and record keeping.

This course provides students with a theoretical understanding of how to examine new and old structures to ensure they are built properly and follow applicable building codes and safety regulations. This course provides an introduction to the basics of working in the building inspection field with the knowledge of construction codes, required documentation protocol, and standard practices.

Students learn site development, site selection, site analysis, site plans, designs, and approval processes. Students are introduced to the principles of construction surveying, project layout, and operation of surveying equipment. Topics include: interaction of surveying with other disciplines, measurements, concepts, accuracy, precision, and levelling; methods for measuring distance, elevation angles, bearings and azimuths using level instrument and transits; traverses and computations; basic topography and mapping. Laboratory and fieldwork experiences include a field trip to a nearby construction project to review equipment site planning and surveying procedures; and a team project to review steps involved in site planning through completion of two types of construction sites: a traverse and an as-built survey.

Construction Procedures, Materials and Testing is a course in which construction systems are discussed along with material stresses and other engineering concepts. The course provides an introduction to materials used in construction as well as techniques used in blueprint reading for building construction. Students learn about construction methods through demonstrations and lab experiments. The main emphasis is on structural steel, masonry, wood, reinforced concrete, and combined structural systems. Students develop understanding of the construction process with different materials. They understand the relevant engineering and mathematical relationships.

Students acquire a basic understanding of managing a project's cost. The course introduces the types of cost estimation from the conceptual design phase through the more detailed design phase of a construction project. In addition, the course highlights the importance of controlling costs and how to monitor project cash flow. Students develop a break-even analysis of construction tasks in a project.

Students develop a basic understanding of project management by comparing alternative designs and construction plans, methods of contracting, design management, and forms of information flow. Activities include preparing master plan schedules, tendering procedures, contractor cost calculations, and bid preparation. Students learn to budget, to plan and schedule construction, to manage production, and to employ project controls. Students acquire a basic level of proficiency in appropriate software.

Writing for Emerging Media introduces students to the theories and practices behind interactive new media writing including the history of and ethics involved in writing for online media. Students analyze new media and write their own online projects such as blogs, websites and wikis.

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of interpersonal communication. Students will learn the basic elements of the communication process, the psychology of communication, the messages in communication, and various types of interpersonal communication, including gender and intercultural communication. Practical experience will be gained through in-class workshops and field research assignments.

Focuses on the nature and responsibilities of the police officer?s role. Topics include the following: police work as a profession, image of the police, tensions, conflicts, and the cooperation between the police and the community.

This course is a case and textbook study of substantive criminal law, and the variations and similarities between the states and the federal system of criminal law principles, with an emphasis on New Jersey criminal law.

An introduction to the Constitutional civil liberties and rights assured to the American people. The course provides students with an understanding of the dynamics of the United States Supreme Court?s approach to the Constitution?s guarantees of personal liberties and civil rights. Students will explore such diverse topics as the preferred freedoms of speech, press and religious expression, separation of Church and State, the Constitutional right of privacy, the rights of persons accused of crime and the civil rights of historically- disadvantaged groups and persons.

Focuses on report content through interpretation and evaluation of information. Emphasis is placed on accurate terminology.

Corrections3 Credits

Various correctional settings and approaches are examined. Topics include punishment, probation, the prison community, and parole. Also studied is the role of community resources in treating the non-institutionalized offender, i.e. through halfway houses, alternative programs, and work and study release.

An introduction to the American juvenile justice system. The course provides an overview of the history of juvenile justice and a theoretical basis for interpreting the meaning and frequency of delinquent behavior and status offenses. Students will explore the various causes of delinquency, including psychological and sociological theories, the relationship between gangs, drugs and delinquency and the modes of interaction between law enforcement and juveniles. Students will also examine juvenile court procedures, due process rights of juveniles, alternative dispositions of offenders, including community intervention and residential/institutional confinement, and the future of juvenile justice.

Examines the organization and functioning of law enforcement agencies including recruitment, career development and leadership selection. The historical and contemporary relationships of various levels of police organization are examined as well as the structure of police organizations in the United States.

Examines the techniques, methodologies, and procedures of criminal investigation. Topics include conduct at the scene of the crime, recognition, development and the preservation of evidence, and interview and interrogation techniques. Finally, the role of surveillance and use of informants are analyzed. Legal and ethical issues are also discussed.

This course explores a wide range of ethical issues and moral dilemmas confronting practitioners in the field of criminal justice. The student is exposed to the traditional and competing theories of ethics in general; and, using case studies, applies these approaches to contemporary issues and problems confronting persons engaged or practicing in law enforcement, the courts, corrections and criminal justice policy-making.

The externship in Criminal Justice is designed to develop professional standards and practical skills. This elective course will provide studentswith the opportunity to integrate theoretical principles learned in the classroom with firsthand experience in actual Criminal Justice agency settings. Students will perform tasks and engage in meaningful learning activities in order to acquire knowledge of the workings of a significant component of the criminal justice system. Students will develop interpersonal skills, values and the attitudes associated with professional growth. Under the direction of a faculty member and the supervision of an agency Field Supervisor, students will perform agency tasks nine (9) hours per week for 15 consecutive weeks for a total of 135 hours [add]. In addition, students will attend weekly seminars at the College during the externship to discuss and share their experiences and observations with faculty and peers.

This is an introductory course on the nature of the criminal justice system. The history, development, and current functioning of the system are examined. Emphasis is on the inter-relationship of various elements within this system including the police, the prosecutor, the defense, the courts, corrections, probation and parole officers.

In this course, students learn to analyze and detect potential threats related to networked or to standalone computers. The course addresses security issues for TCP/IP at various network layers of the Internet including different strategies to harden the system against threats and attacks. Topics covered include data privacy availability and integrity, security issues, basic cryptography, email security, ways to provide privacy, source authentication, message flow confidentiality, and management business responsibility regarding compromised confidential data. The laboratory portion of the course reinforces topics covered in lecture as students gain experience in detecting vulnerabilities, identifying malicious malware, and hardening the network by implementing countermeasures against cyber threats and attacks.

This course covers several topics such as Computer Security Technology and Principals, software security and trusted systems, threats, attacks and assets, security functional requirements, computer security strategy (security policy, security implementation, assurance and evaluation), data integrity, data confidentiality, data authenticity and data availability.

This course introduces beginning students to computers and the latest application software. The course includes the history of computers, information processing, file management, discussion of hardware and software, operating systems and utility programs, and the Internet. The laboratory component includes Microsoft Office XP (Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint). This course may not be used for credit by Computer Science or Management Information Systems majors.

This course provides students with the skills and knowledge required in the field of ethical hacking. Lecture topics introduce the concepts of security testing and network defense/countermeasures against vulnerabilities in networks and incident-handling-methods used when information security is compromised. Students learn how hackers compromise systems and remove their footprints. The laboratory portion of the course reinforces topics covered in lecture by enabling students to learn how to protect networks and systems by using methods learned in class. This course prepares students to take and pass the Ethical Hacking Certificate, which is recognized by industry and sponsored by the Ethical Hacking Console (EC).

This course is a restricted program elective required for students majoring in Cybersecurity. Students learn about the science of computer forensics and the important procedures necessary for investigating various cybercrimes. Digital forensics investigations are based on the concepts of collecting, analyzing, recovering, and preserving forensic evidence; students learn computer file system storage, analysis, and retrieval. This course prepares students to take and pass the Certified Forensic Investigation Practitioner exam (CCE), industry-recognized certificate by forensic investigators and law enforcement. This course requires two hours of lecture and two hours of hands-on lab.

This is an introductory course in scientific programming using a current programming language to solve science and engineering problems. Emphasis is on the logical analysis of a problem and the formulation of a computer programming leading to the solution.

This course introduces the different tools needed to design and maintain web pages. The standard tool of web page design, HTML (HyperText Markup Language), will be the core design tool. Interactivity through the use of scripts will also be addressed. The process of transferring HTML pages through FTP (File Transfer Protocol) to be published on an official web site will also be addressed. Auxiliary tools such as graphics design, which is an important component of web page design, will also be investigated.

Introduces the fundamentals of computer science. Algorithm design, flowchart, structure, programming methodology, hardware and software are discussed. A programming language such as Pascal, C++, or Visual Basic 6.0 is used to illustrate these concepts.

Provides further study of the construction of algorithms and their implementation in a programming language. Techniques of structured programming are featured. Emphasis is placed on the solution of engineering problems. Students are expected to construct and execute problems using top-down step-wise refinement approach.

The basics of number systems. Boolean algebra and logic gates lay the foundation for the study of combinational logic and computer science. Combinatorial applications include Karnaugh Map techniques for logic simplification.

In this course the fundamentals of computer science are introduced, with emphasis on programming methodology and problem-solving. Topics include, but are not limited to, concepts of computer systems, software engineering, and algorithm design, programming languages and data abstraction, with applications. A high level language is fully discussed and implemented and serves as a vehicle to illustrate many of the concepts taught.

This course will introduce students to Java Programming, an object-oriented language. Students will develop stand-alone business applications and create applications called from within HTML page (applets) designed to be transported over the Internet and executed by browsers. The syntax, control structures, methods, arrays, strings and characters and graphics will be applied to bring interactive applications to web clients.

Includes a detailed study of components of computer systems, structures, machine language instruction set and assembly language for both 8-bit and 32-bit processors. Projects are assigned in assembly language. Other topics covered are addressing techniques, macros, file I/O, storage, program segmentation, and linkage. Data structures are covered by means of program preparation.

The operation of Flip-Flops as memory elements and counter analysis of Ripple/Synchronous mod counters are covered as building blocks for future design application. The major emphasis on counters is on the design of irregular and truncated counters using D and J-K Flip-Flops and integrated circuit applications of Up/Down counters and dividers. Also includes a coverage of timers, oscillators, and three-state operation. Registers are covered and include counting (Ring and Twisted Ring) shifting (Left/Right) and timing applications. The latter part of the course is devoted to arithmetic applications including 2?s complement adders and subtractors with overflow and underflow detection, and BCD arithmetic and arithmetic/logic I.C. units. Computer instructions, timing and control, executions of instructions, and designs of a basic accumulator-based computer are also covered. The laboratory exercises are organized to support the above theory and to enable students to design, assemble, and test applications constructed with MSI/LSI chips.

Examines data structures and their software implementation. Topics include top-down design; pointer variables and dynamic data structures; linked lists, stacks, queues, recursion, graphs, tree search and backtracking; and sorting/searching techniques.

Provides both the basis for a solid education in the fundamentals of database technology and an introductory coverage of SQL. Topics include database management systems, relational data base systems, query languages, and application development systems.

This course is structured to explain the functions of an operating system. During the course, students will be introduced to what operating systems are, what they do, how they do it, how their performance can be evaluated, and how various operating systems compare with each other. The main purpose of this course is to give students a solid background in the components of the operating system, their function, and goals, and how to interact and interrelate with them.

Introduces students to the technology of data communications. Topics covered include data transmission mode, techniques, devices, link control and characteristics, use of modems and multiplexers, fundamentals of communication software, and data networks. Laboratory exercises will include file transfer, the use of modems on a dedicated of dial-up link, on-line database search, and use of remote timesharing.

The course will cover the basic theoretical and analytical foundations for systems planning, formulating strategic plans, optimizing operations in business, designing information systems, and augmenting business activities on web. Topics include five systems cycles, hardware selection criteria, input/output design, file structures, and design. This is a case study-oriented course.

This course provides students with the basic concepts of network computing, the seven layers of the Open System Interconnection (OSI) Model, Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) 802 networking model, and the benefits of various protocols. Students will understand peer-to-peer and server-based networks and their differences. They will become familiar with various networking topologies and how to select the best network topology for an environment. Students will learn how to install and configure NetWare TCP/IP software, how to use common TCP/IP applications, and how to troubleshoot common problems that may occur in a TCP/IP environment. This course also provides the background information needed in preparation for network management and certification.

The course is an introduction to basic principles of programming using Python. Python is an open-source scripting language that allows rapid application development of both large and small software systems. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of data storage, input and output, control structures, functions, sequences and list, dictionary, sets, and file Input/Output. Students learn how to design algorithms, write external and internal documentation and design and write source code in Python.

Helps students acquire the skills and perspective they need in order to simultaneously succeed in college and prepare for careers. Students explore the cultures of college and the workplace with an emphasis on the role of communication skills, credentials, and research techniques in each. Time and stress management are also considered. Students submit weekly journals on assigned topics. In addition, they participate in small group discussions and seminars, investigate the support services available in the College and community, and prepare job search portfolios.

The operation of Flip-Flops as memory elements and counter analysis of Ripple/Synchronous mod counters are covered as building blocks for future design application. The major emphasis on counters is on the design of irregular and truncated counters using D and J-K Flip-Flops and integrated circuit applications of Up/Down counters and dividers. Also includes a coverage of timers, oscillators, and three-state operation. Registers are covered and include counting (Ring and Twisted Ring) shifting (Left/Right) and timing applications. The latter part of the course is devoted to arithmetic applications including 2?s complement adders and subtractors with overflow and underflow detection, and BCD arithmetic and arithmetic/logic I.C. units. Computer instructions, timing and control, executions of instructions, and designs of a basic accumulator-based computer are also covered. The laboratory exercises are organized to support the above theory and to enable students to design, assemble, and test applications constructed with MSI/LSI chips.

Presents the architecture and operation of the microcomputer. Topics include an introduction to the 8086 microprocessor including its architecture, operation, and instruction set. The instruction set is studied through programming examples. Interfacing to the 8086 microprocessor is thoroughly studied. Input/output port configuration and interrupt management are introduced and used in numerous design projects. The laboratory experiments consist of designing projects. Students are exposed to projects that include solving both software and hardware issues. The tools used include a PC loaded with an 8086 assembler and connected serially to a SDK-86 kit. Laboratory experiments cover an 8086 arithmetic program, accessing data in memory, using a PC to write a program with an assembler, generating digital waveforms, nested loops programming, reaction time programming, using D/A converters with microprocessors and vector graphics.

The Externship courses in the Early Childhood Education Program are designed to allow the student to develop professional standards and practical skills in an early childhood setting. This course will provide the student opportunity to gain first-hand experience and learn the process of integrating knowledge skills and techniques with teaching practice. Students work or volunteer in 120-hour field experience at a child care center, school or site that provides care and education to children. They are expected to perform the required professional tasks of assisting the regular classroom teacher in implementing the center?s child development and activity program, and to gradually assume the responsibilities of a ?group teacher.? Under the direction and supervision of the regular classroom teacher, the student will plan and implement activities that are appropriate to both the age and developmental level of the children.

A sequential continuation of ECE 231, Early Childhood Education Externship I, this course will provide the student opportunity to gain firsthand experience and learn the process of integrating knowledge skills and techniques with teaching practice. Students are placed in a field experience at a child care center, school or site that provides care and education to children. They are expected to perform the required professional tasks of assisting the regular classroom teacher in implementing the center?s child development and activity program, and to gradually assume the responsibilities of a ?group teacher.? Under the direction and supervision of the regular classroom teacher, the student will plan and implement activities that are appropriate to both the age and developmental level of the children. Students will work or volunteer 120 hours at the externship site in fulfillment of course requirements.

In this course, students learn to be reflective educators by documenting and assessing student learning, analyzing classroom management strategies, collecting information relating to instruction, and evaluating professional relations to support the process of teaching and learning. This course is a two-hour lecture for a full semester and complements the field work requirements of the courses in the A.A.S. Early Childhood degree program.

This course introduces students to the Child Development Associate Credentialing process and provides comprehensive instruction in early childhood education/child development. Students will begin development of a professional resource file and practice strategies for observing and recording children?s behavior. At the conclusion, students will have satisfied 60 hours of the 120 hours of formal training required by the CDA National Credentialing Program. Students are expected to be employed, or to volunteer, either full-or- part-time, in a child care center, preschool or pre-kindergarten program. The course is required for the Child Care Certificate and can be applied to the A.A.S. in Early Childhood Education as a substitute for ECE 201, Introduction to Early Childhood Education.

This course helps students expand their knowledge of the Child Development Associate Credentialing process and provides comprehensive instruction in early childhood education/child development. Students will develop skills in planning curriculum for preschoolers and complete their professional resource file. The course offers 60 contact hours of formal training. Combined with ECE 100, CDA Workshop I, students will satisfy the 120 contact hours of formal training, as required by the CDA National Credentialing System. Students are expected to be employed, or to volunteer, either full- or-part-time, in a child care center, preschool or pre-kindergarten program. This course is required for the Child Care Certificate and can be applied to the A.A.S. degree in Early Childhood Education as a substitute for ECE 211, Early Childhood Curriculum.

Students are either placed, or expected to be employed, at a child care center, school or site that provides care and education to children. Students will demonstrate competence in assisting the regular classroom teacher and gradually assume the responsibilities of a ?group teacher.? Students will plan and implement activities that are appropriate to both the age and developmental level of the children. This course is required for the Child Care Certificate and can be applied to the A.A.S. degree program in Early Childhood Education as equivalent to ECE 231, Early Childhood Education Externship I.

An introduction to the field of early childhood care and education, core knowledge is introduced in the areas of child development theory, a healthy, safe environment, developmentally-appropriate curriculum, child guidance, family relationships, cultural and individual diversity and professionalism. Students will understand the importance of early childhood education as part of the whole educational process. Pre-or Corequisite: ENG 101(This course meets one of the required components of the New Jersey Infant/Toddler Credential.)

In this course, students extend their understanding of early childhood education. Emphasis will be on planning programs and activities that are developmentally-appropriate for children ages birth through eight. To help in understanding and meeting the needs of different age groups, developmental characteristics for each age group will be related to planning, curriculum, and general expectations. Students will develop themes and lesson plans, construct learning materials, and collect ideas for interest areas and activities.

Students will develop curricula based on a few important principles. The approach is a practical one, with opportunity to gather a wide repertoire of ideas, as students experience creative and cooperative learning practices. Field trips to museums and places of interest are required.

Students will acquire knowledge, skills and dispositions in using individual and group guidance and problem-solving techniques to develop positive and supportive relationships with children. Methods will be practiced in promoting positive strategies of conflict resolution, and in developing personal self-control, self-motivation and positive self-esteem for the child, ages birth to eight.

Students will learn how children acquire communication skills, and how teachers can strengthen children?s natural explorations of speaking, listening, writing and reading. Whole language, the natural approach and emerging literacy will be presented. The goal is for students to understand their role in helping children to become readers.

Course materials and class activities will provide a means for students to develop an appreciation for diversity. Attitudes will be examined, along with the development of knowledge of culture, gender, social class awareness, and physical differences. Strategies for valuing children will prepare future teachers for teaching with dignity in a diverse world. Students will practice, via class discussion, role play, and other process-oriented techniques, the infusion of an anti-biased perspective in all curriculum areas.

This course is an introduction to the practice of caring for infants and toddlers in a group care setting. Students will become familiar with child development, the role of caregivers, developmentally-appropriate curriculum and materials associated with the care of infants and toddlers. Students will explore the importance of developing positive relationships with culturally diverse parents and communities. The course will involve students in observations, group discussions and projects, material-making, and reviewing infant and toddler policies and practices. Field work requirement is 12 hours of observations. Prerequisite: ENG 101 (This course meets one of the required components of the New Jersey Infant/Toddler Credential.)

This course involves the study of policies, guidelines, and procedures of providing high quality care in safety, health, nutrition, and special needs for children from birth to age three. Topics include creating and maintaining safe indoor/outdoor learning environments, emergency response procedures, promoting health and preventing illnesses, providing and fostering good nutrition, and recognizing, understanding, and supporting children with special needs. Developmentally appropriate materials, practices, and activities are discussed as they relate to infant toddlers' safety, health, nutrition and needs.

This course focuses on the ways early experiences and relationships impact infants and toddlers from birth to age 3, emphasizing infant/toddler mental health, risk and resiliency, family-centered practice, social-emotional development, supportive families, parenting, and the influences of cultural diversity. Students participate in 12 additional hours of observation outside of class time.

This course introduces students to the basic structure, terminology, and scope of macroeconomics. Topics include a definition of economics; supply, demand, and the resulting macroeconomic problems; national income accounting; determination of output and employment levels; savings and investments; inflation and unemployment; money and banking; and fiscal and monetary policy.

This course is a continuation of ECO 201. It covers market structures; theory of consumer behavior; supply, demand and elasticity; costs of production; price and output determination; current economic problems; and international economics.

Based on the current ideas about teaching in America today, this course is a practical introduction to the teaching profession. It explores the knowledge attitudes, behaviors, and skills of good teachers and provides a realistic foundation for understanding the field of education and teaching as a profession. Students build a foundation of self-knowledge, knowledge of education as an institution and as a career, knowledge of teaching competencies and of issues in education. Students are required to spend a minimum of 12 hours in an elementary or secondary school classroom observing and recording child behaviors.

In this course, students learn to be reflective educators by documenting and assessing student learning, analyzing classroom management strategies, collecting information relating to instruction, and evaluating professional relations to support the process of teaching and learning. This course is a one-hour lecture for a full semester and complements the fieldwork requirements of the courses in the Education degree programs.

An integrated study of AC and DC circuits in which the sinusoidal system is introduced early in the course. The course covers the concepts of Ohm?s Law, Kirchhoff?s Laws, and DC circuits such as series circuits, parallel circuits, and series-parallel circuits. The study of capacitors and inductors serves as an introduction to the sinusoidal system and the behavior of R, L, and C in such a system. The laboratory component includes the use of test instruments in experiments dealing with Ohm?s Law, series circuits, parallel circuits, and series-parallel circuits, followed by a study of internal resistance and loading. The final experiment supplies facility in the applications of the oscilloscope.

Introduces solid state devices. Emphasis on device terminal characteristics and models. The course includes the PN junction transistor characteristics, BJT biasing techniques, BJT models, BJT small signal amplifiers, junction field effect (JFET) and metaloxide silicon-field effect (MOSFET) transistor characteristics. Experiments cover semiconductor diode circuits, half-wave rectifier, full-wave characteristics, common emitter transistor characteristics and the parameters and components of a transistor amplifier circuit.

Continuation of the integrated approach of Electric Circuits I. Concepts are extended to the analysis of AC systems power transformers, network theorems, network analysis, resonance, and filters. The associated laboratory supplements the course and introduces the use of additional test instruments as signal generators, frequency counters, and AC measuring instruments. The experiments cover Thevenin?s Theorem, RC transients, Lissajous figures for phase-shift measurement, AC series circuits, AC parallel circuits, and series and parallel resonance.

Continuation of EET 212, Active Electronics Devices. Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) small signal multistage amplifiers, decibels, and power amplifiers are studied. Junction field effect and metal-oxide-silicon field effect transistor biasing, and small-signal operations are covered. Consideration will be given to the frequency response characteristics of BJT and JFET circuits. The experiments study the performance of small-signal amplifiers, connected in the common-emitter mode, the emitter-follower mode, and the common-based mode, followed by an analysis of cascaded RC coupled amplifiers. The analysis and design of biasing, and FET small-signal amplifiers. The final experiment is a detailed analysis of the frequency response of a transistor amplifier.

Examines the characteristics, analyses and design of wave-shaping, switching, and digital circuits. Emphasis is on circuits and systems which use discrete semiconductor devices. Integrated circuit fundamentals and applications are present in succeeding courses. Topics include switching operation and characteristics of semiconductor devices; clipping, clamping, and limiting circuits; pulse nomenclature; logic circuit fundamentals; binary arithmetic and truth tables; triggered devices, and multivibrator circuits and counter circuits. The laboratory component of the course is intended to analyze circuit components, breadboarding of basic logic circuits, experimental analysis of pulse switching, and triggering circuits. In addition, proper testing techniques for these systems are developed. Experiments cover pulse fundamentals, pulsed response of RC circuits, diode clippers and clampers, BJT and FET switches, logic inverters and gates, discrete logic gates, Schmitt- trigger circuits, the unijunction transistor, the monostable and astable multivibrator, and the bistable multivibrator.

Introduces the characterization and operation of integrated circuits in analog systems. Follows the sequence of courses in active electronic devices and their applications. This covers descriptions and applications of operational amplifiers and linear integrated circuits, as well as their use as building-blocks for linear and nonlinear analog systems. Topics included are inverting and noninverting amplifiers, buffer amplifiers, signal generators, timers, voltage regulators, active filters, function generators, multipliers, and D/A conversion. Limitations of op-amps are discussed, as well as other topics dictated by student and instructor interest. The laboratory component complements the course material. Proper breadboarding techniques are introduced and integrated circuit testing and evaluation are performed. The laboratory supports the theory with experiments in linear application of op-amps, nonlinear application of op-amps, signal generators and timers, data presentation-differentiator, integrator and triangular wave generator, and active filters. The student selects a project from the text or other literature.

An introduction to the characterization and operation of integrated circuits in digital systems. A description of the various families of digital integrated circuits are given, including T-FL, ECL, and CMOS. Emphasis is on the operation and applications of TTL digital IC?s such as the 7400 family of chips. Basic digital blocks such as the AND, OR and NOR gates are first studied, followed by the combinational and sequential IC systems, which are commercially available. These include the hex inverter, NAND/NOR gates, BCD to decimal decoder, exclusive OR, AND-ORINVERT gate, full adder flip-flops, and emory. Also, counters shift registers and A/D-D/A conversion are discussed. The laboratory component of the course permits the student to properly breadboard, test, and evaluate digital integrated circuits and to observe and verify the applications of these systems by performing experiments in IC logic elements, combinational logic analysis and implementation, decoders, data selectors and data distributors, counter analysis, counters and registers, and trouble-shooting project.

Presents the theory and operation of RF circuits, tuned circuits, amplifiers, and oscillator circuits. The theory of amplitude and frequency modulation including the principles of AM and FM transmitters and receivers are covered in detail. Also deals with single-side bank transmission and pulse modulation. The laboratory exercises cover AM transmitters, AM receivers, FM transmitters, FM receivers, tuned RF amplifiers, and oscillators.

This course involves the student in the practical aspects of electronic fabrication from proposal preparation to printed circuit board assembly and test. Application of electronic schematics, parts lists, layouts and artwork enables the students to produce similar documentation for a personal project that he/she will select as part of the course requirement. Heavy emphasis on parts selection and procurement, breadboarding, printed circuit board fabrication, assembly, soldering techniques and heat sinking are provided in this laboratory-based course.

Presents the architecture and operation of the microcomputer. Topics include an introduction to the 8086 microprocessor including its architecture, operation, and instruction set. The instruction set is studied through programming examples. Interfacing to the 8086 microprocessor is thoroughly studied. Input/output port configuration and interrupt management are introduced and used in numerous design projects. The laboratory experiments consist of designing projects. Students are exposed to projects that include solving both software and hardware issues. The tools used include a PC loaded with an 8086 assembler and connected serially to an SDK-86 kit. Laboratory experiments cover an 8086 arithmetic program, accessing data in memory, using a PC to write a program with an assembler, generating digital waveforms, nested loops programming, reaction time programming, using D/A converters with microprocessors and vector graphics.

The course employs fundamentals of geometry and engineering design to acquaint students with various disciplines of engineering. The course will utilize an engineering graphics component throughout the semester (freehand and CAD). It will include two engineering modules (chemical and mechanical). In addition to freehand sketching and instrumental drawing, the students are also introduced to AUTOCAD. Students may receive credits for both EGS 101 and this course.

The course is designed to familiarize students with technical drawing and design, orthographic projections, perspective, freehand sketching, instrumental drawing, tolerance, sectional views, descriptive geometry. Students are introduced to AUTOCAD mid-semester and perform some projects using this software.

This course is an extension of engineering physics courses on mechanics. Topics covered include the equilibrium of particle and rigid body systems subject to concentrated and distributed forces, the motion of particles and rigid bodies, the relation of motion of particles to various force distributions and torques, work energy relations, impulse momentum relations, and conservation principles.

This is the introductory course for the Paramedic Program. The student will be introduced to their role and responsibility, concepts of illness/injury prevention; medical/legal issues, and communications.

This course covers airway management and ventilation, all areas of patient assessment and physical examination. Pathophysiology, pharmacology clinical decision-making, communication and documentation will be emphasized.

This course integrates pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the patients experiencing problems with the following systems: pulmonary, cardiology, neurology, endocrinology, allergy /anaphylaxis, gastroenterology, and renal/urology.

This course integrates pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for patients experiencing emergent problems of the following conditions: toxic exposure, hematopoietic dysfunction, environmentally induced (or exacerbated) medical condition, infectious and communicable diseases, and behavioral/psychological, gynecological, and obstetrical emergencies.

This course integrates pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for neonatal, pediatric, geriatric, patients and persons who have sustained abuse/assault, those with special challenges, and those with acute deterioration of a chronic problem.

This course covers aspects of trauma care including: mechanisms of injury, hemorrhage, shock, soft tissue trauma, burns, head and facial, spinal, thoracic, abdominal, and musculoskeletal trauma.

This course integrates the principles of assessment-based management in the implementation and plan for patients with common complaints. In addition, the course will cover the safe and effective ground and air medical transport, general incident management, multiple casualty management, rescue awareness and operations, hazardous material incidents, and crime scene awareness.

This course provides extensive clinical practice experiences so that the student may apply learned theories and skills while still under the guidance of a preceptor. Once completed, the student will be eligible for the certification examination for EMT ? Paramedic status.

In Clinical Practicum I, students participate in activities with live patients. Students rotate through various departments within the hospital gaining practical experience in patient assessment, basic medical procedures, and advanced medical procedures within the scope of practice for a New Jersey Paramedic. Students integrate into a comprehensive, multidisciplinary medical team who manage patients in the in-hospital setting in various levels of health. Co-requisites: EMT 101, EMT 110, and EMT 120.

In Clinical Practicum II, students continue to participate in activities with live patients. Students rotate through various departments within the hospital gaining practical experience in patient assessment, basic medical procedures, and advanced medical procedures within the scope of practice for a New Jersey Paramedic. Students integrate into a comprehensive, multidisciplinary medical team who manage patients in the in-hospital setting in various levels of patients' health. Pre-requisite: EMT-124; Co-requisites: EMT-220 and EMT-230.

The EMT course provides the didactic knowledge and practical skills required to become certified as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be eligible to take both the State of New Jersey and National Registry of EMTs certification exams for EMT - Basic Providers. Note: There is a significant amount of lab/practice hours required for this course.

In Clinical Practicum III, students conclude their clinical experience while continuing to participate in activities with live patients. Students rotate through various departments within the hospital gaining practical experience in patient assessment, basic medical procedures, and advanced medical procedures within the scope of practice for a New Jersey Paramedic. Students integrate into a comprehensive, multidisciplinary medical team who manage patients in the in-hospital setting in various levels of health. Pre-requisite: EMT 235; Co-requisites: EMT 240 and EMT 245.

The Paramedic Clinical Capstone are activities that occur at the end of the educational process to allow students to demonstrate and practice high-level decision making by integrating and applying all of their Paramedic learning. The capstone experience is the final clinical clearance before National Registry Testing. Students are required to successfully complete 18 out of 20 patient contacts in order to complete the requirement, as well as successfully complete the terminal simulation with the program's Medical Director. Pre-requisite: EMT 248; Co-requisite: EMT 250.

This course is designed for students who need to develop introductory writing skills before attempting college-level coursework. Students are guided through the process of writing by engaging in activities such as pre-writing, editing, and revising. They review essential grammar and paragraph structure. Offered in conjunction with RDG 070, Fundamentals of Basic Reading.

This course is designed for students who need to develop writing skills before attempting college-level coursework. Students are guided through the writing process and practice such pre-writing activities as freewriting, brainstorming and outlining. They learn the principles of paragraph structure and development strategies for editing, and review essential grammar. Offered in conjunction with RDG 071, Basic Reading I.

This course is designed for students who need to develop writing skills before attempting a full college-level schedule. Students are guided through the writing process and practice such pre-writing activities as freewriting, brainstorming and outlining. They learn the principles of paragraph structure and development, strategies for editing, and review essential grammar. In addition, they learn the principles of developing and organizing longer essays. Offered in conjunction with RDG 072, Basic Reading II.

This course is designed for students who need preparatory work in writing before attempting a full college-level program. Students practice developing and organizing essays in response to a series of challenging readings. Grammar is reviewed on an individual basis as needed. Offered in conjunction with RDG 073, Basic Reading III.

This workshop, required of ENG 101 students whose writing sample score is less than 7, provides instruction in essay revision. Students use word processors to facilitate revisions; instructors meet with students as essays are revised both at the terminals and at the conference desk.

College Composition I helps students strengthen their college-level writing skills. Students deepen their critical thinking and hone their writing process and judgement as they compose for a variety of purposes and audiences. Throughout the semester, students revise and edit their writing to produce well-developed, grammatically clear, and coherent academic prose. While Composition I does not require a research paper, students begin to select, integrate, and synthesize outside sources into their compositions.

This is a writing course that prepares students for the many technical writing tasks they will encounter in the workplace. It provides thorough coverage of the basic skills and common techniques of technical writing. Students will use a wide range of examples and model documents to help them develop the skills necessary to produce clear and effective reports.

Speech3 Credits

This course teaches the oral communication skills students need in order to accomplish their college and career goals. All students address the class in talks designed to inform, persuade, and instruct. They also explore interviewing strategies; giving and using feedback; group discussion rules and roles, and the impact of culture, gender, and politics on communication. Students submit weekly logs chronicling their responses to readings and films as well as their own selected speaking/listening experience.

This course is designed for students interested in learning the art and science of journalism, including how to write a feature, conduct an interview and edit columns. It covers fundamental concepts and techniques that are common to all the media, with practical experience in those techniques; analysis of what is produced in the media; techniques that are specific to print, radio or television news reporting, with experience in producing material in the three media; and some of the professional issues, standards and traditions that inform journalism as a career. Further, it introduces electronic resources that are now part of everyday life for a journalist.

Students will develop their skills as fiction, poetry and drama writers. They work at conceptualizing, composing, revising, and editing their work. They keep a writer?s journal, discuss assigned readings, participate in peer group criticism, and meet for individual conferences with the instructor. Key goals are to increase students? awareness of the possibilities of expressive writing forms, styles, and themes, and also to increase awareness of the creative process in its many variations.

This course offers instruction in the techniques of effective business communication. Students practice formats and rhetorical strategies required in the business environment, including common types of letters, memoranda, and reports. Organization, tone, and diction are stressed, as are grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

Writing for Emerging Media introduces students to the theories and practices behind interactive new media writing including the history of and ethics involved in writing for online media. Students analyze new media and write their own online projects such as blogs, websites and wikis.

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This workshop is required of ENG 101 students whose Writing Sample score is less than 7 and who are enrolled in dedicated sections of College Composition I for former ESL students. The course provides guided practice in writing, revising and editing while offering additional instruction in two areas where proficiency is needed for communicative competence, but where non-native speakers? less extensive knowledge puts them at a disadvantage: grammar and culture. Students use a word processor to write and revise paragraphs and short essays.

Advanced English Seminar is a culminating course for the English major. Students choose a focused and appropriate topic with significant direction and support from professor(s) and librarians, concentrating reading and research on a literary work(s), theme, time period, or author. Advanced English Seminar promotes advanced critical awareness of, and engagement with, a specialized topic and promotes creative and intellectual development. In addition to a final writing project and presentation, students compile a portfolio of their work throughout their college career. Advanced English Seminar prepares student writers to meet their educational and professional goals. Class lectures and discussion emphasize student-driven inquiry to include close reading, research, literary criticism, and analysis, and synthesizing sources.

students read diverse selections of non-fiction create their own personal essays and develop in-depth memoirs. develop and submit portfolios at mid semester and end of semesters.

This course is a continuation of College Composition I. It provides instruction in writing essays, with a special focus on argumentation and research. Required readings survey a range of current social and political issues. The course culminates in a research paper based on library research.

English Internship is a practical course supplying English majors with hands-on experience in a work environment. Students gain experience in a supervised work setting related to the student's area of interest. Internships include government, non-profit, small businesses, newspapers, publishing, education, advertising, and other settings. Students must successfully complete 150 hours of practical experience in an approved internship site. Students may find their own placements, or seek help from the Career Services Office. Internships will include a significant writing component and may include writing in social media, marketing, websites, emails, letters, documents, reports, and creative expression. During the one hour of lecture time each week, students share internship experiences and the professor covers writing styles appropriate to various settings.

This course focuses on the interactions between the natural environment, social organizations, and social behavior, with studies of the social factors that cause environmental problems, the societal impacts of those problems, and societal efforts to solve these problems. The course explores issues of science and technology, popular culture, economics, urbanization, racial and gender relations, as well as social movements. This course develops a broad understanding of society and environmental issues.

The course explores the relationship between theory, policy and the social construction of the urban environment. It examines the social, cultural and technological forces that shape our contemporary cities. The course also addresses issues that continue to challenge urban society, including environmental injustice and racism, degradation of local environmental quality, and the impact of local and global relationships on community scale environments.

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary thinking about the relationships between humans and their environments, and it seeks to explore the problems and possibilities that emerge from these relationships. Students will also learn the importance of natural resources, ecosystems and biodiversity; evaluate and discuss the effectiveness of environmental policies, and identify energy resources and approaches to waste management.

This course introduces principles and practices of sustainability and conservation. It explores the origins and evolution of the discourse surrounding the idea of sustainable development, as it applies to local and global processes and practices. Other topics include: population and consumption, sources of energy, pollution, climate change, food, and water cycle and use.

This course is designed for both students majoring in Environmental Studies and also for non-science majors who are interested in learning the fundamental weather and climate principles with major focus on the atmosphere as an important part of our environment. The topics will include the composition and general structure of the atmosphere, energy balance and energy exchange, atmospheric moisture and cloud formation, atmospheric pressure and wind, as well as general, regional and local circulations, cyclonic and several storms, climate classification and climate change and environmental issues relating to weather and climate.

This course deals with environmental policies and how American society has responded to environmental problems through law and policy. Current environmental policies expressed in State and Federal legislation are examined. The course examines governmental agencies involved in regulations and implementing policies and acts, such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, and Right-to-Know Law.

This course introduces students to environmental effects on human health. Students gain an understanding of the impact of natural environmental factors and pollutants on human disease as well as formulate possible solutions to the major environmental health problems facing individuals and communities in industrialized and developing countries. Lecture topics include the effects of the environmental pollutants and chemicals on human health such as asbestos, lead, pesticides and tobacco. Students examine health issues through various case studies with an emphasis on possible future approaches to control health problems influenced by the environment.

ESL Academic Discussion II is taught in conjunction with ESL Reading II and builds upon the skills acquired in ESL Level I courses. Audio and visual media are used to support and enhance the content of the linked reading course. Students also learn and practice discussion strategies and the principles of English pronunciation in the context of the reading course material.

Introduction to ESL Writing in conjunction with ESL 030 Introduction to Grammar for ESL Writing is designed for students whose placement scores indicate limited or no ability to write in English. Students begin by writing simple sentences about their own lives and experience. As they study vocabulary and the organization of writing in English, including concepts of main ideas and supporting details, they gradually move to writing multi-paragraph compositions using the structures and concepts they have studied.

Introduces the beginning ESL student to writing in English using the process approach and self- and peer-editing strategies. Fluency and correctness are developed through the application of basic grammatical structures taught in ESL 031.

ESL Writing II builds upon the writing skills acquired in Level I. Using the process approach to writing, this course focuses on developing topic sentences and expanding compositions through the use of supporting ideas and details. Editing skills are developed through the application of grammatical structures taught in Grammar for ESL Writing II.

ESL Writing III provides intensive writing practice for low-intermediate ESL students. Both the writing process and the development of a clearly-written product are addressed. The course introduces multi-paragraph essays and focuses on paragraph and essay development in a variety of rhetorical modes. Use of coherence markers, cohesive devices and sentence variety is emphasized. Intermediate grammatical structures taught in ESL 033 are applied to writing using self- and peer-editing strategies.

ESL Writing IV builds upon the writing skills acquired in Level III. Using the process/product approach to writing, this course focuses on writing multi-paragraph essays. The thesis statement with appropriate topic sentences and supporting ideas and details are developed in a variety of rhetorical modes. Editing skills are developed through the application of grammatical structures taught in Grammar for ESL IV.

Introduction to Grammar for ESL Writing combined with Introduction to ESL Writing supports and develops the ability of beginning writers to express themselves in English. It is designed for those students whose placement scores indicate limited or no knowledge of English. Basic grammatical structures are introduced and practiced in class through speaking and writing. Proficiency in grammar is defined as the ability to use the structures studied in the writing the students do.

Introduces basic grammatical structures in the context of writing. Structures such as the present and simple past tense verb forms, subject-verb agreement, basic modifiers as well as word order are studied and applied in writing activities using peer- and self-editing strategies.

Grammar for ESL Writing II develops usage of previously learned basic grammatical structures by focusing on word and tense choice in narrative and descriptive writing. Additional basic structures such as adverbs, prepositions, and future forms are addressed in the context of writing. Students apply grammar concepts in writing activities using self- and peer-editing strategies.

Grammar for ESL Writing III continues study and application of grammatical structures in the context of writing. The course refines usage of previously-learned structures and introduces use of perfect tenses, comparatives and superlatives, and adjective clauses. Students apply grammar concepts to writing activities using self- and peer-editing strategies.

Introduction to ESL Reading together with ESL 060 Introduction to ESL Academic Discussion is designed for those students whose placement scores indicate limited ability to comprehend written English. Phonics and pronunciation, vocabulary, reading strategies, and skills such as comprehension, drawing inferences, identifying main ideas and supporting details are taught and practiced in the context of thematically related readings.

ESL Reading I is taught in conjunction with ESL Academic Discussion I and builds upon the skills acquired in ESL Level 0 courses. Through texts, supplementary readings and audio and visual media related to an academic theme, students learn to read for overall meaning and to identify main ideas, distinguishing them from supporting ideas. They develop critical thinking skills, increase their vocabularies and improve their reading comprehension.

ESL Reading II is taught in conjunction with ESL Academic Discussion II and builds upon the skills acquired in ESL Level I courses. Through texts, supplementary readings and audio and visual media related to an academic theme, students sharpen their critical thinking skills, increase their vocabularies and improve their reading comprehension.

ESL Reading III is taught in conjunction with ESL Academic Discussion III. Through texts, supplementary readings, and audio-video media related to an academic theme, students increase reading comprehension by developing their understanding of the relationship between textual content and structure. They learn to identify different rhetorical modes, word connotations and denotations, and the writer?s purpose.

ESL Reading IV is taught in conjunction with ESL Academic Discussion IV. Through texts, supplementary readings, and audio-visual media related to an academic theme, students refine their critical thinking skills, improve their reading comprehension, and develop an ability of thinking beyond the text.

College Course Workshop is a co-requisite of any content course offered to ESL students through paired-course-learning communities. It helps students meet linguistic challenges that they may encounter in the content course. At the same time that it helps students meet these challenges, it promotes students? development of the reading and writing skills that they need to cope with the content course demands. The instructors of both courses share materials and coordinate lessons throughout the semester.

Introduction to ESL Academic Discussion is taught in conjunction with Introduction to ESL Reading. It is the listening and speaking component of a four-course program designed for those students whose placement scores indicate limited or no ability to understand spoken English. Phonics and pronunciation, vocabulary, reading strategies, and skills such as comprehension, drawing inferences , identifying main ideas and supporting details are taught and practiced in the context of thematically related readings.

ESL Academic Discussion I is taught in conjunction with ESL Reading I and builds upon the academic and communicative skills acquired in ESL Level 0 courses. Audio and visual media are used to support and enhance the content of the linked reading course. Students also learn to recognize and produce the sounds of American English in the context of the reading course material.

ESL Academic Discussion III is taught in conjunction with ESL Reading III. Audio and video media are used to support and enhance the content of the linked reading course. Students refine their pronunciation and communication skills through active listening, academic discussion, and presentation.

ESL Academic Discussion IV is taught in conjunction with ESL Reading IV. Audio and video media are used to support and enhance the content of the linked reading course. Students learn and practice discussion strategies, debating techniques, presentation skills, and effective academic communication skills required in mainstream college level courses.

ESL Reading and Discussion IV is a four-credit course taught in conjunction with a college course, as a paired-course-learning community. Through texts, supplementary readings and audio-visual media related to the college course, students refine their critical thinking skills, improve their reading comprehension skills, and develop effective oral communication skills required for the linked college course.

ESL Reading and Discussion III is a four-credit course which combines ESL Reading III, ESL Academic Discussion III and the content presented in the linked college-level course, as a paired-course learning community. The course teaches content vocabulary and general reading and academic discussion skills to help students meet the linguistic demands of a content course.

Grammar for ESL Writing IV continues emphasis on structures acquired in previous levels and on self-editing strategies. More complex structures, such as the passive, noun clauses, unreal conditionals, and reported speech are introduced and incorporated in writing activities.

This course introduces students to simple and complex movements using free weights and machines. Students learn the principles underlying strength training and its relationship to human movement patterns. Students learn how to design personal resistance training programs that safely strengthen musculature. Lab activities apply lecture material and focus on safe and effective resistance training principles, basic functional anatomy, muscular strength and endurance, and basic nutrition.

This course is an introductory study of nutrition. Sports nutrition incorporates the principles of biochemical and physiological processes related to cells and tissue responses to exercise. This course includes specific applications of nutritional theory to help individuals reach and maintain maximum sports performance. Students learn the basics of sports nutrition and how to apply this knowledge to their own active lifestyles. Additionally, this course examines vitamins, nutritional supplements, body composition, weight management and eating disorders in both male and female athletes.

This course provides an overview of exercise physiology, sport and exercise psychology, biomechanics, motor behavior, sociocultural aspects of sport and exercise, sports nutrition, and other related topics. Various aspects of careers, requirements for advanced study and learning, certifications, and license necessary for professions in Exercise Science fields are explored.

Students learn a variety of formats for cardiovascular exercises and training. Self-assessment and development of realistic programs using specific training methods and equipment provide the student with a broad spectrum of options in cardiovascular training. Through lecture and laboratory exercises, students are introduced to both the practical and physiological aspects of a safe and effective workout program.

This course emphasizes the analysis of the principles of movement through anatomical design. Major joints of the body, their actions, and muscles that do those actions are stressed. Application to physical exercise is stressed in lab work on strength, endurance and potential motion of major joints.

This course includes the study of human responses and adaptations to exercise of varying levels of stress and intensity. Major topics include bioenergetics, the physiology of the circulatory, respiratory, muscular and nervous systems as they apply to exercise, and the underlying physiological basis of fitness. Laboratory experiences illustrate the practical application of theoretical content with hands-on experiences to measure and apply the concepts learned in lecture.

This course stresses the appropriate measurement of various aspects of human exercise. Measurement of body composition, cardiovascular efficiency, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and other physiological parameters are explored and practiced. Students learn how to develop individualized and properly designed exercise prescriptions for adults, including special populations.

This course introduces students to common athletic injuries and illnesses, prevention measures, signs and symptoms, emergency management, and common treatments. Emphasis is placed on prevention and emergency management of acute and overuse injuries common to active lifestyles. Pre-requisites: BIO-211, ENG-101.

This is a basic course in film history focusing on the technical and artistic evolution of the medium and including the basic vocabulary of the cinema. Students view films from a variety of periods and genres by influential directors and studios, considering the political and social impact as well as historic perspective.

This course provides an introduction to the literature of Latin America through the examination of selected films. Major Latin American literary and historical periods are examined as represented within these films. Writing, in the form of reaction papers and a research paper, is an essential component of the class. The course is taught in English.

This course explores the roles played by women in the movies, past and present, both on screen and behind the camera. Students consider the history of female directors, producers, and screen writers as well as actresses. Students also examine the ways the cinema has shaped the images of women in our society.

This course introduces basic landforms and geological processes. Topics include an introduction to plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, volcanoes,weathering, geologic history, earthquakes, crustal deformation, mountain building, and formation of the continents. The concept of global plate tectonic will be a frame structure for discoveries through the course. Laboratory work includes minerals and rocks analysis, earthquakes, and review of the geologic calendar. 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab Pre-requisite: Exit Basic Math Co-requisite: ENG 101

This introductory course covers the evolution of maps and projections, as well as the modern uses of GIS and Remote Sensing (RS). This course explores various methods of capturing data for use in GIS, including digitizing from maps, digital photos, satellite imagery, and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). A NASA program used to simulate satellite movements is utilized in this course. 2 hours lecture/2 hours lab Pre-Requisite: Exit all Basic Skills

This course focuses on the principal political, economic, and social revolutions that have swept through Europe, Asia and Africa over the past 300 years. Students will consider, for example, how the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment have shaped our modern world view and its impact on the continents of Asia and Africa. Other topics that will be considered include the impact of the French Revolution on modern politics, and the meaning of ?Liberty, Brotherhood, and Equality.? The course will also cover the Industrial Revolution and its effect on the lives of ordinary men and women in Europe; Nationalism, Imperialism, and European expansion. Consideration will be given also to the horrors and accomplishments of the twentieth century on a global level.

This course surveys the history of American immigration both forced and voluntary from colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on understanding how America changes immigrants and how immigrants have changed America. The course explores the formation of identity and values by different ethnic groups over time and the resultant tensions created within the common bonds of community.

This course traces the course of American history over the last 110 years. Subjects to be considered include Reconstruction, the destruction of the Plains Indians, the peopling of America, ethnic and racial tension, the rise of America to a global power, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Sixties, and the recent past.

The historical experience of African-Americans has often underlined the shortcomings of American society: slavery, Civil War, racism and Jim Crow laws. Yet, from Jamestown in 1619 to Anytown, USA today, African-Americans have helped build America, fought its wars, and, most importantly, helped to define our unique American identity. This is a story for all Americans.

This course considers Africa and the Islamic Middle East by examining their often intersecting histories. Key issues include African kingship, the gold and slave trades, the rise and spread of Islam, the Ottoman Empire, European Imperialism, nationalism, and the challenges of the recent past.

This course surveys the broad sweep of Latin American history from the Mayan and Incan civilizations through the recent past. The volatility of the multicultural societies of these lands, spilling over into fractious violence and brilliant creativity, will be a recurrent theme.

This course is designed as a survey course that examines the experiences of women in the United States. This course will focus on the history of women from pre-European contact to the present. Students will come to understand the role of women and their contributions by examining their written records from the past to the present.

This course examines the history of Western Civilization from ancient times to about 1400. It covers the development of Greek, Roman, Medieval, and early modern civilizations including Africa and Asia. Topics include the first world religions, the first cities, the origins of democracy and many other crucial beginnings. While the focus shifts from country to country, the subject always remains the same: the rise of the West from a global perspective.

This course surveys the broad sweep of Latin American history from the eve of European contact in the fifteenth century through the recent past. Patterns of change overtime, and their notable exceptions, are recurrent themes in the course, including colonialism, independence, nationalism, transculturation, artistic and literary expression, neoliberalism, and the region's contributions to important hemispheric and global developments. Prerequisite: ENG 101

This course examines the various social, cultural, economic, and political currents that led to the formation of the United States of America. The course considers the first Americans, the settlement of North America by Europeans, the American Revolution, Federalism and the Constitution, slavery, the Civil War, and other key issues and events in the American past from pre-Columbian times to 1877.

This is a course designed to identify principles of health, disease, nutrition, stress management, and exercise necessary in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Concepts of risk factors, morbidity, and mortality are discussed.

Community Health is three hour lecture course that introduces the major concepts and principles of community health and the determinants of health status in communities. Community health covers the basics of administration, public health laws, and human resources managements. The course also discusses areas, such as health information, ethics and leadership.

This course combines lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on training and practice. Students will learn to recognize and respond to emergencies including shock, cardiac emergencies, poisonings and first aid assessments and interventions. A significant amount of the course involves demonstrations and practice labs.

The course provides an overview of the field of substance abuse and addictions including but not limited to the psychopharmacology related to treatment. In addition, the course conveys an understanding of the impact of abuse on individuals, families, communities and society. Substance use is approached from a variety of prospective; behavioral, pharmacological, historical, social, and clinical.

This is an introductory course for students who are planning a career in healthcare or a health-related field. This course provides students with a foundation for success in future courses as well as an introduction to the various health professions and the interrelated interdisciplinary health care teams. The course explores resources for health career planning and the concepts of professionalism, healthcare ethics, cultural competence, global health issues, and health care polices.

Examines the concepts of both wellness and illness in terms of causation, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and classification. Knowledge of anatomy and physiology and medical terminology is helpful for the successful completion of this course. Course may be offered only once during an academic year.

This course provides students with an understanding of the basic concepts and issues that are associated with the management and regulation of healthcare providers and the delivery of health services. Emphasis is placed on third party payers in reimbursement of health care services. These include Medicare, Medicaid and Private Insurers. Alternative systems of organization are also introduced, as are changes occurring in the health care professions and the health care sector as a whole. Prerequisite: Exit Basic English.

This course examines the legal aspects of the relationship between the patient and health care service providers. The legal obligations of health care providers are discussed. Subject matter covered includes, but is not limited to, topics such as negligence, malpractice, uniform donor acts, informed consent, medical ethics, living wills, and current trends in this area.

This course is intended to cultivate a student's knowledge and skill necessary to effectively communicate and interact with culturally diverse populations in the health care setting. Students gain an understanding of the process in developing cultural competence as a means of responding effectively to the ethnic and racial demographic changes challenging our health care system, identify potential social, political, and economic determinants of health care disparities; and understand the importance of providing culturally and linguistically appropriate healthcare services with accreditation and regulatory agencies.

This course introduces students to environmental effects on human health. Students gain an understanding of the impact of natural environmental factors and pollutants on human disease as well as formulate possible solutions to the major environmental health problems facing individuals and communities in industrialized and developing countries. Lecture topics include the effects of the environmental pollutants and chemicals on human health such as asbestos, lead, pesticides and tobacco. Students examine health issues through various case studies with an emphasis on possible future approaches to control health problems influenced by the environment.

Students are engaged in ongoing service through partnerships with community agencies as an integral part of the course. The service-learning component addresses such topics as basic communication and relationship skills. Students learn about and are exposed to under-served and under-represented populations. Students are introduced to skills and issues relevant to medicine, nursing and health professions, social work, and epidemiology.

This course introduces students to the concepts of health equity and health disparities. The course uses the lens of social justice as the broad overview of health disparities in the United States is explored. The course examines relevant historical issues, theories, and empirical data, emphasizing critical analysis and application of knowledge. Students gain a better understanding of research on health disparities and interventions to promote health equity. Pre-requisite: ENG-101.

This course provides a broad perspective of public health and presents both local and global public health challenges that face our society in the 21st century. The course provides an overview of the dynamic field of public health, its basic framework, concepts, and methodologies. The focus of this overview is on improving and maintaining health on a population level through identification, surveillance of disease, and injury prevention strategies. Pre-requisite: ENG-101.

This course presents an overview of global health issues from the perspective of health as a human right. The course analyzes the impact of biological, socio-cultural, economic, environmental, and political determinants of health. Students examine past and emerging infectious diseases, chronic disease, and the impact of environmental and political emergencies on the delivery of disease prevention and health promotion.

Students develop a basic understanding of the contemporary threats to, and challenges of, maintaining the safety and security of the citizens, critical infrastructure and interests of the United States. Students are introduced to the concepts of identification, mitigation, preparedness, response, and discovery when dealing with various civil crises.

Students develop an understanding of the contemporary threats and challenges of maintaining the safety and security of the citizens, critical infrastructure, and interests of the United States. Through lecture and discussion, students develop an understanding of the balance between the identification of threats and the vulnerabilities of individual rights in a democratic society.

This course provides insight into and analysis of the ideology, structure, financing, and driving forces behind domestic and international terrorist individuals and groups. Students explore the cultural and ideological philosophies as well as the social, economic, political, and religious conditions of select states, groups, and individuals that comprise the phenomenon of terrorism. Additionally, the course offers a critical analysis of governments' responses to the war on terrorism, including contemporary models of counterterrorism.

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the role of intelligence gathering as historically practiced in the United States and the way the intelligence community looks and operates today. Students in this course read, analyze, and discuss the role of intelligence gathering in maintaining the security of the United States. Students learn to identify and assess potential terror threats to the county taken from intelligence information.

This course introduces Hospitality Management students to the dynamic and diverse tourism industry. This course views the industry from a business perspective - examining the management, marketing, and finance issues most important to industry members. Students learn the basics of marketing, selling and promoting to the traveling public, how to connect with tourism service suppliers, and the steps to putting together a tour for a specific market segment. This course offers a view of today's tourism industry that is as interesting and multi-faceted as the field itself. Prerequisites: HMT 112 and HMT 128

This course is an introduction to the organization and structure of hospitality organizations from a management perspective. It is designed to provide the student with the basic understanding of the dimensions and scale of the hospitality industry, and identify many of the career opportunities available to them. Guest lecturers are utilized to provide a balance from the industry?s perspective.

Students must successfully complete 300 hours of practical experience within the 15 weeks of the semester at an approved establishment. Practical experiences may include hotel front office, telecommunications, guest reception, cash handling and control, housekeeping, and convention sales and services. Assistance in finding appropriate placement is provided. The employers evaluate the student?s performance, and a coordinator monitors each student?s progress. Practicum sites must be approved prior to the beginning of the semester by the Coordinator or Executive Director.

This course introduces the student to the overall operations of a hotel through the front office guest cycle. It features information on front office computer/technology, yield management, and reservation systems. Emphasis is on the front office responsibilities and the various tasks involved during a guest?s stay.

The student will gain an understanding of the marketing function in the field of hospitality. Emphasis is placed on marketing, planning, generation and use of marketing information, segmentation, positioning and the development and use of specific marketing tools. The course also covers areas such as menu design, advertising, sales and promotion, merchandising, personal selling, and the use of external advertising media.

This course introduces students to the related responsibilities involved in managing convention and group business. Convention sales, planning, post-convention evaluations, and marketing techniques used to promote ideas into the various market segments are discussed. The course is useful for both meeting planners and convention service managers.

This course is an overview of all aspects of housekeeping management. It includes the phases of staffing, planning and organizing the technical details of covering each area of a hotel. Topics covered also include laundry room management, inventory control, departmental operating budgeting, and risk and environmental management.

The student will gain an in-depth knowledge of the overall operation and management of a restaurant. This course will also include the human resources aspect of restaurant operations to include employee training and the organizational structure of the service staff. Emphasis will also be placed on strategies of serving food, wines, and beverages. A financial overview of the industry will cover the financial analysis relative to operational costs and controlling variable expenses.

This course will cover the basic knowledge of wine and food pairing. The student will review the categories of wine and how they may be used to make food combinations on menus and wine lists. This course will incorporate etiquette and protocol in business and social settings to include domestic and international common courtesies, greetings and introductions, communications, and dining etiquette.

This course is designed to enable the students to identify and understand the principles of laws and their relevance to the hospitality industry. Students will obtain the legal knowledge needed to enhance the guest experience and to prevent hazards that could potentially lead to lawsuits.

The student will gain knowledge of the overall operation and management of a restaurant, including employee training and the organizational structure of the service staff. Emphasis will be placed on strategies of servicing food, wines, and beverages. This course will include management?s perspective on meeting customer expectations and the importance of the interaction with guests. This course will also cover a financial overview of the industry, the major factors affecting the growth of the business, food merchandising, promotion and sales. Students will learn the crucial elements involved in the successful operation of a restaurant.

The urban approach to entrepreneurship will be discussed, emphasizing the successful use of interpersonal and presentation skills. This course is designed to assist students in identifying the environments within which urban entrepreneurs operate. While not only discussing the significant role that business owners play in urban communities, the course will also offer cross-functional solutions to business problems.

This course focuses on factors that contribute to creativity and innovation within organizations. The course includes experiential methods, case studies, workshops, team projects, guest speakers, and readings. Students are encouraged to try new approaches to creative problem solving in many different environments. Each class will focus on different variables related to creativity, such as team dynamics, creativity under pressure, or managing creative individuals.

This course introduces Hospitality Management students to the dynamic and critical field of technology within the hospitality and travel industry. Students learn the basics of purchasing, implementing, maintaining, and effectively managing today's information systems in hospitality and travel.

Franchising3 Credits

This course will help students to understand franchising and its role in the hospitality industry. Students will learn the differences between entrepreneurship and franchising, franchise selection, and market analysis. Topics for the course will include legal and business issues that arise in the franchise relationship.

This course is designed for Hospitality Management students with emphasis on equipment, tools and cooking methods used in the Culinary Arts. The student will develop an understanding of the ?back of the house? operations and basic customer service from a management perspective.

This course will cover an overview of the travel and tourism industry, through its involvement of transient clientele. Students will learn about the dynamics of the industry and its many foreign and domestic elements. The course will include an overview of the history of travel, including the characteristics of the popular modes of travel. Favorable destinations and career opportunities that can service those destinations will be covered. Co-requisite: HMT 110

This course is designed to provide a foundation in entrepreneurship. The course will provide students with an understanding of the ongoing challenges for entrepreneurs in the key functional areas such as marketing, finance, and operations. Learning media, such as case studies and business plan templates, will be used to examine the opportunities that exist in new venture planning. Individual and organizational level issues will be addressed. Additionally, the course covers the legal and ethical implications that exist for Entrepreneurial planning. Prerequisite: Exit Basic Math and Basic English II

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to work and travel in a global environment focusing on the interrelationships between geography, tourism, and culture. The course includes the cultural, recreational, and social significance of geography and regional economy to the traveler. Co-requisite: ESL Writing Level III or Basic English II

This course is designed to introduce students to the methods and techniques utilized in planning, organizing, and promoting events specific to the travel and tourism industry. The course will emphasize the planning process and students will develop the skills expected of meeting and event planners within travel tourism. Topics will include negotiations and contracts, site selection, and program development. Pre-requisite: Exit all Basic Skills

Integrates materials from literature, the fine arts, the social sciences, and religion. Students learn about cultures and perspectives other than their own and write a series of essays examining value systems and cultural differences. Readings for the course are chosen from novels, short stories, plays, autobiographies, and ethnographic works.

An introductory course in Women's Studies that includes explanation of the origins of traditional male and female roles and the effects of these on work, family, sexuality and education.

The Seminar on Women's Issues examines the principles of feminist literary analysis, scholarship and research through texts authored by women writers and through diverse theoretical writings on race, language, sexuality, creativity, class and subordination which form the basis of feminist criticism. Within the theoretical context students will explore writings by women from diverse ethnic and cultural traditions on issues of current feminist scholarship.

This course examines the effect that food acquisition and production has had on the development of civilization. Topics include ancient to modern methods of food-gathering and preparation, as well as technological developments. These topics will be examined for their relationships to the anthropological and sociological evolutions as affected by the diets throughout the history of humanity. Different cultures will be explored in an effort to better understand their origins and how they evolved.

Students are placed in an agency that focuses on addictions issues in order to apply their coursework in the field. This course integrates knowledge and theory gained from the classroom throughout the human services and addictions sequence as it is applied to the field experience. Students use evidence based practices. The requirements are fulfilled on the basis of working 135 hours of work at a site placement and attending a weekly seminar class to discuss their experiences. Pre-requisite- HUS 231

This introductory course offers an overview of the human services profession. It emphasizes human needs and social problems; provides an historical perspective of the development of the profession; and introduces students to professional values, ethical behavior, theories, knowledge and methods necessary for helping others.

Students deepen their understanding of professional values, strategies of intervention, and behavior necessary for helping others. Students learn problem-solving skills and participate in activities to increase self-understanding.

This course exposes students to various groups that are encountered when working in the Human Services field. Students observe and analyze key aspects of group dynamics such as power and control within a variety of small-group settings: counseling, discussion, support groups. Students explore and practice key interpersonal skills such as conflict resolution, decision-making and goal-setting under instructor-guided simulations. Leadership skills are developed along with personal behavioral style. Various theoretical perspectives are discussed throughout the course.

Students learn how human service professionals produce change in the communities in which they live, work and participate in order to improve the quality of life and relationships among the members of those communities.

Students are placed in a second social service agency that extends and deepens HUS 231. The the expectation in this course is the integration of knowledge and theory gained from the classroom throughout the human services sequence as it is applied in the field experience. The requirements are fulfilled on the basis of working 9 hours per week for 15 consecutive weeks for a total of 135 hours. In addition, students attend a weekly seminar to discuss their experiences. Students may remain in the same agency two terms with permission from the faculty member.

Examines the methods of data collection employed within a variety of social service agencies. Emphasis is placed on the helping interview, its elements and characteristics. In addition, concepts of communication, interaction, the self, and interviewing skills will be examined and practiced.

The externship in Criminal Justice is designed to develop professional standards and practical skills. This elective course will provide students with the opportunity to integrate theoretical principles learned in the classroom with firsthand experience in actual Criminal Justice agency settings. Students will perform tasks and engage in meaningful learning activities in order to acquire knowledge of the workings of a significant component of the criminal justice system. Students will develop interpersonal skills, values and the attitudes associated with professional growth. Under the direction of a faculty member and the supervision of an agency Field Supervisor, students will perform agency tasks nine (9) hours per week for 15 consecutive weeks for a total of 135 hours [add]. In addition, students will attend weekly seminars at the College during the externship to discuss and share their experiences and observations with faculty and peers.

This course promotes competence in addictions counseling by focusing on the following topics: individual, group, and family counseling; treatment of the addicted person; familial aspects of counseling; techniques of crisis intervention; and ways to provide education. Students already employed in fields related to Addictions Counseling can enroll in these courses to become a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) working under the supervision of a Licensed Clinical Alcohol and Drug Counselors (LCADC). This course helps to fulfill the Counseling educational domain for the certification.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of addictions counseling and emphasizes the role of collaboration in seeking and using community resources. Students learn about resources available in New Jersey to assist clients. The course looks at the criminal justice system and its levels of involvement in addictions treatment. This course introduces students to the basic skills required for professional readiness including documentation and identifying levels of care. This class identifies and introduces underlying principles and competencies of modern addiction counseling, its complexity and application. This course helps to fulfill the educational requirements of the Certification Board of NJ to become a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). Following completion of the educational requirements for the CADC students need to complete 3000 hours of supervised fieldwork experience to receive the certification.

This course addresses initial interviewing, assessment, intake and early phase counseling processes utilized at addiction treatment centers. Students address the role of screening and assessment in the initial intake process. Students develop skills in the area of initial assessment. Students analyze the current DSM categories and criteria of Substance Use Disorder and their implementation. Students learn about different forms of addiction including gambling. Students discuss the physical impacts addiction can have. This course helps to fulfill the educational requirements of the Certification Board of NJ to become a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). Following completion of the educational requirements for the CADC students need to complete 3000 hours of supervised fieldwork experience to receive the certification.

This course reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of the effects of addictions on the abuser and the family. Biopsychosocial information is reviewed. Students develop competency in areas of ethical and legal conduct necessary to begin entry-level work in the addictions field. Competency is also developed in the area of multiculturalism as it impacts counselors at all service levels. This course emphasizes knowledge of the effects of the different drugs (i.e., Opioids, Stimulants, Depressants, Analgesics, THC). Students are able to define co-dependency and the roles commonly assumed by families affected by Substance Use Disorder.

This course introduces standards for ensuring thorough documentation in addictions counseling. Students learn about the counselor's need for cultural competence, personal growth, and professional growth. The course explores counselor/client expectations based on goals, objectives, rules, and obligations. This course reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of addictions counseling professionals' conduct related to ethical, legal, personal, and professional development, and the practice and benefit of clinical supervision. The importance of community involvement including professional networking is emphasized through lecture. This course helps to fulfill the educational requirements of the Certification Board of NJ to become a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). Following completion of the educational requirements for the CADC students need to complete 3000 hours of supervised fieldwork experience to receive the certification.

This course examines the important place that death and dying hold in the human experience and the many ways in which people come to terms with this essential aspect of living. Students will learn about the impact of history, culture, religion and developmental status on understanding death and final rites and rituals. Contemporary ethical issues involved with death and technology will also be considered.

This course examines the nature of the contemporary family and its relationship to the school and provides practical advice for developing strong home-school relationships. Examples of building good home-school partnerships and fostering familial involvement in schools with examples of activities and strategies will be practiced. Students are required to spend a minimum of 12 hours in interviewing, observing and recording parent and child behaviors. Prerequisite: ECE 201 or EDU 211 (This course meets one of the required components of the New Jersey Infant/Toddler Credential.)

This course integrates Cultures and Values (HUM 101) and College Composition II (ENG 102). Students learn about several cultures, Western and non-Western, ancient and modern, through selected readings, films, art and music. Instruction in writing essays and research papers is an integral part of the course.

This course will explore the significance, purpose and aim of multicultural studies in a diverse society. Relying on history, sociology, anthropology, political science and education, students will focus on learning the content and meaning of multiculturalism in America. Students will be encouraged and required to participate in activities intended to deepen their understanding of diversity and then reflect on the ways in which this knowledge might inform multicultural studies in practice. Aspects of culture and identity that will be covered include race, socioeconomic class, religion, ethnicity, gender and ability. Students will also be encouraged to consider the various approaches to multicultural studies and the schooling practices that result.

Women and Literature more than introduces students to writings by and about women; it helps students explore and understand the varied roles women writers play in history. Students read global selections of twentieth-century and contemporary writings-fiction, essays, drama, and memoir- that examine diverse issues such as gender, politics, cultural division, and social status. Pre-requisite: ENG-101.

In this course students read, discuss, analyze, write about and experience the short story, in the process learning about the genre's elements and its variety of forms. Students are exposed to a range of periods, regions, and sensibilities, and are made familiar with a variety of literary sub-genres and literary terminology.

Introduction to Poetry is a survey class that introduces students to poetry as a literary form. Students analyze poems in terms of language, meaning, form, and cultural and historical contexts.

Contemporary Drama focuses on late 20th - 21st Century plays, and the analysis of their theatrical structures from the perspective of theatre artists - playwrights, actors, directors, and designers. The emphasis of the course is to develop the student's ability to appreciate the intellectual and intuitive work required to create a theatrical experience from a written text in today's theatre.

This course aims at fostering appreciation for the language of literature, as well as for literature as an examination of human experience and values. Students read short stories, poetry, drama, and one or two novels. The readings for the course illustrate a variety of cultural perspectives. Students are required to write a series of interpretive essays.

This course fosters appreciation for the forms and content of American literature as an imaginative exploration of the nation?s experience and values. It is a representative survey of American fictional and non-fictional prose and verse. Students read a variety of writers and genres from all periods of American literature, 1600 to the present. Students are required to write a series of interpretive essays.

This course introduces students to the literature of Caribbean women. Readings highlight Caribbean women?s heroism, grassroots activism, courage and struggles in their own words from their own perspectives. Through a variety of readings, students will gain knowledge and an understanding of the struggles, difficulties and triumphs in the lives of Caribbean women.

This course introduces students to the academic study of culture. Novels, songs, movies and other cultural artifacts will be analyzed in the context of race, class, gender, ethnicity, etc. The students will read the writings of literary and cultural critics and learn to write and present their own analyses.

This course introduces students to a wide variety of dramatic forms through the study of plays ranging from ancient Greece to modern times. Students will learn to read, discuss and write about plays exemplifying a variety of approaches to drama.

British Literature to 1650 is a historical survey introducing the literary masterworks of Great Britain from the earliest writings to 1650. This course introduces pivotal literary works such as Beowulf and Canterbury Tales; Arthurian literature; and medieval poetry, prose and drama. The course concludes with William Shakespeare. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama.

In this course, students examine children?s literature in its historical, cultural and literary contexts. Poetry, fiction, and nonfiction for children from infancy through adolescence are examined in the light of cultural and historical ideas about children and their development. Special attention is given to ways in which issues of culture, ethnicity, race, and gender are represented in children?s literature.

This course provides an introduction to a variety of literature from Central and South America and the Caribbean. Special attention is given to the ways in which literary works reflect Latin America?s political turmoil, social tensions, and remarkable cultural history. All works are taught in English translation.

In African-American Literature, students read a variety of fictional and non-fictional prose and verse by African-Americans from the eighteenth century to the present. In addition to oral literature, autobiographies, slave narratives and letters, the course surveys poetry, drama, the short story, and the novel. The material is treated in both literary and non-literary contexts in order to foster understanding and appreciation of the African-American experience.

This course provides an introduction to the Latino literature of the United States, which is written in English. Although writers from various Latino backgrounds will be studied, the course will primarily examine the literature of the Chicano, Cuban-American, and Nuyorican writers who write from an American perspective. Topics such as identity, assimilation, bilingualism, and growing up in the U.S. are analyzed while exploring this new literature.

The many changes in women's autobiographical works of the 20th century now make it possible to explore contemporary issues of and about self in rewarding and challenging ways. Students will read a richly diverse selection of 20th century women writers across cultures. This course develops an understanding of the female experience through women's autobiographies and participants' writings including students' autobiographical essays. Discussions will be focused on literary techniques and the genre of autobiography.

An introduction to science fiction through a range of novels and short stories. Special attention will be given to ways in which science fiction imagines the impact of scientific and technological change.

World Literature I is a historical survey introducing the literary masterworks of the great world civilizations from the first extant creation narratives through the European Renaissance or 16th Century. Attention is also given to religious works underlying major world religions.

World Literature II is a historical survey introducing the literary masterworks of the great world civilizations from the 17th century to the present. This course introduces selected works from the Pacific, Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Prerequisite: ENG 101

Introduction to The Novel traces this literary form from its beginnings in Don Quixote to the present time. Students read excerpts and full-length novels, learning what differentiates the novel from earlier literary forms: length of over 150 pages; a primary plot, and possibly several sub-plots; populated with several characters, showcasing a protagonist and an antagonist; depth and development of characters' inner lives.

An introduction to the basic functions underlying the sound management of a business enterprise. Topics covered are planning, organizing, staffing, influencing, and controlling.

Marketing3 Credits

A study of business activities involved in the flow of goods from physical production to consumption. Operations management, international management and business ethics are also studied.

The development and direction of personnel, including job planning, recruitment, selection, career development, evaluation, grievances, and discipline.

The financial problems and policies of a business corporation are discussed. The following areas are covered: financial planning, management of short-term and intermediate credit, working capital, trade credit, financial statements, retained earnings, credit and collection practices.

A study of labor/management relations focuses on the collective bargaining process. Federal/state legislation, grievance procedures, and wage issues are discussed.

Introduction to the challenges and problems encountered in small business operations. Specific evaluation of organizational, financial, and personnel aspects are studied. The role of the Small Business Administration is examined as well as other types of assistance to the small enterprise. Prerequisite: MAN 121 or permission of instructor.

This course offers an analysis of the basic ideas and methods of collecting, tabulating, and representing data. Topics include frequency distributions, histograms and frequency polygons: measures of central tendency, variability percentiles; Z-scores, elementary probability, binomial and normal distributions; linear regression and correlation, and hypothesis testing.

This course teaches the essentials of college algebra. The topics include polynomials, first-degree equations, word problems, graphing, systems of linear equations, factoring, exponents, quadratic equations, matrices, and radicals.

This course provides an introduction to the logic of mathematics and measurement. The role of mathematics in the health professions and the application to problems encountered by the health professional are discussed. Topics covered include basic computation with non-negative rational and real numbers, ratios and proportions, scientific notation, and logarithms. The metric system, its nature, and specific applications to medical dosages and other health problems are also examined.

This course covers the mathematical and numerical skills for ratios, proportions, rate and percentage problems, and the metric system. Also included are the following: the mathematics of buying, pricing and selling, payrolls, insurance, depreciation and profits, simple and compound interest, bank discounts, consumer credit, corporation stocks and bonds, and other investments.

Continuation of MAT 112. The main topics considered are conic sections; parameterized curves; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; vectors in plane and space; functions of two or more variables; multiple integrals; and integrations in vector fields. Use of mathematical software in problem-solving is emphasized.

EOF NON CREDIT Refresher: Basic Algebra

This workshop is required for all students taking MAT 073, Basic Algebra I. The workshop emphasizes problem-solving.

Basic computational skills and problem-solving using these skills. Topics include whole numbers, common fractions, decimals, percents, ratio and proportion, measurement, and geometry. Placement is determined by the College Placement Test.

Topics in this elementary algebra course include signed numbers, linear equations, polynomials, factoring, algebraic fractions, quadratic equations, simultaneous equations, and the coordinate system. Placement is determined by the College Placement Test.

A course in mathematics with special emphasis on applications to business, economics and related fields. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications involving supply, demand, revenue, cost, profit and break-even points, matrices and systems of linear equations, graphing, Leontief Input-Output model, and mathematics of finance. Classroom instructions will be presented using a TI-83+ graphing calculator.

Precalculus4 Credits

This course provides the preparation necessary for students who intend to study calculus for science and engineering programs. Topics include the following: fundamentals of algebra; linear inequalities; functions and relations; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions; analytic trigonometry; analytic geometry; complex numbers; and discrete algebra, logic, and proof.

Students in appropriate non-STEM programs apply mathematics to real-world problem solving. Topics include critical thinking skills, sets, Venn diagrams and their applications, logic, tree diagrams, graphs and sets, mathematical system, graphs, functions, linear and quadratic functions, probability, and statistics.

Calculus I4 Credits

This course considers the limits, continuity, theory and techniques of differentiation and integration, with applications of both processes to science/engineering. The use of mathematical software in problem-solving is emphasized.

Calculus II4 Credits

This course is a continuation of MAT 111. Topics include calculus of transcendental functions, integrations by parts, trigonometric integrals, improper integrals, sequences and infinite series. The use of mathematical software in problem-solving is emphasized.

Methods for solving ordinary differential equations are studied, together with physical and geometrical applications. Laplace transforms and numerical and series solutions are included. Use of mathematical software in problem- solving is emphasized.

EOF NON CREDIT Basic Math workshop

Systems of linear equations, Gauss elimination, matrices, determinants, vector spaces of ordered n-tuples and functions, linear transformations, inner products, orthogonal basis, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and related vectors. Machine computation will be used to illustrate and supplement mathematical ideas and concepts.

This course begins the administrative portion of the medical assisting curriculum. It is a study of the techniques associated with patient reception, appointment scheduling, processing mail, management of telephone calls, medical record keeping, maintenance of medical office files, composing and processing medical correspondence. Course is offered only once during the academic year.

This course is a continuation of COP I. Practical experience is provided in the following: minor office surgery, administration of medications, venipuncture, ECG, asepsis, examinations and procedures in specialties, first aid and CPR. Course is offered only once during the academic year.

This course continues the study of the administrative aspects of a medical practice, beginning with professional fees and credit arrangements to an overview of management responsibilities CPT-4 and ICD9 CM coding will be introduced and the student will code insurance forms. Course is offered only once during the academic year.

The course focuses on the mastery of the typewriter, PC, dictaphone, and care and operation of the equipment. Correct English usage, business letter forms, and the transcription of recorded medical dictation in appropriate report form are stressed. Emphasis is placed on the development of accuracy and speed to meet the special requirements of the medical field.

This course is an introduction to drugs and drug therapy, including sources of drugs, dosage forms, drug legislation, principles of drug action and pharmacokinetic factors in drug therapy, drug interactions and incompatibilities. Major drug classifications are identified and studied according to physiologic action and/or body system affected. Course is offered only once during the academic year.

Students are placed in the offices of participating physicians, HMOs, or clinics for a minimum of 200 hours of practical experience in medical assisting during the health care facility's regular hours of operation. They perform the duties of a medical assistant under the direction and supervision of the physician and those health care providers employed in the practice. Students also gain insight into the operation of a medical office. Students are supervised and evaluated by both the site supervisor and the faculty member assigned to the externship program. All prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade-point average of 2.0 before the student is permitted to begin the externship.

This is a basic course in the development of the medical vocabulary commonly used in medical practice. Emphasis is placed on the study of prefixes, suffixes, root words, and combining forms. Physiologic and anatomic terms referring to human tissues and organ systems are introduced. Emphasis is also placed on building the professional vocabulary required of a career in a health care facility.

An introduction to the clinical aspects of medical assisting. Practical experience is provided in the following areas: vital signs, positioning and draping, assisting with examinations, sterilization, asepsis, dressing wounds, recording health history, nutritional needs. Course is offered only once during the academic year.

This course familiarizes the student with coding and classification systems used in health information management. Emphasis is on inpatient coding and classification utilizing ICD-10-CM/PCS. Course work focuses on the official coding guidelines and use of the two volumes of ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS. The laboratory component of the course emphasizes the use of computer-based coding software (encoder) to assign diagnostic and procedural codes by abstracting information from patient records. Students learn to determine the DRG for each patient record coded. Additional classifications are briefly studied stems such as DSM-5, ICD-O, and SNOMED-CT.

This course provides the student with an overview of the guidelines, rules, and terms for the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding classification and the application of those rules to code patient services. A major focus of the course is to prepare the students to correctly code using the CPT manual. Students will learn how to recognize CPT symbols, use the CPT Index, use modifiers, and read an operative report. A laboratory component will allow students to develop skills in coding using computer software and sample health records. Co-requisite MDA 101.

The emphasis of this course is on coding procedures using ICD-10-PCS classification system. The course also contains advance coding of diagnosis using ICD-10-CM. The history, structure, and organization of ICD-10-PCS is reviewed and reinforced with exercises and homework assignments. The sixteen sections of ICD-10-PCS are defined along with their application in coding procedures. The values of each character of a code from each section is applied to create surgical codes. The Tables, Index, and the list of codes are used to access the root operation tables and the construction of a surgical code. The use of the Index and Table conventions are described and used to construct procedural codes. The Medical and Surgical section are emphasized in the courses with the thirty-one body system values and its root operations, body parts, approaches, devices and qualifiers. The organization and classification of the ancillary section such as imaging, nuclear medicine, radiation oncology, physical rehabilitation and diagnostic audiology, mental Attachment II health and substance abuse treatment are studied and coded. In addition, students conduct case mix analysis, identify severity of illnesses and create reports on coding quality monitors.

This course is a continuation of CPT/HCPCS Coding I, providing the student with the knowledge and skills to code ambulatory procedures and services by applying guidelines, rules and terms for the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding classification. CPT/HCPCS codes are used for reporting services and procedures performed by physicians and hospital based ambulatory departments. A major focus of the course is to prepare the students to correctly code case studies using the CPT manual or computer based encoder. Students demonstrate the ability to correctly use the CPT book or CPT coding software by recognizing CPT symbols, the use of CPT Index, use of modifiers and how to read an operative reports. Attachment III Students also learn how to use and report codes from the Evaluation and Management (EandM) section, Surgery section, Radiology section and Medicine section of CPT manual. A laboratory component allows students to develop skills in coding using computer software and sample health records.

The pathophysiology component of this course places emphasis on the disease process affecting the human body course. The etiology and pathogenesis of diseases are described in the course with the application of diagnostic procedures and patient care. The pathology and the underlying principles of the following human systems are presented in this course: inflammation, diseases of the immunity, neoplasia, genetic and developmental diseases, fluid and hemodynamic disorders, cardiovascular pathology, respiratory and gastrointestinal pathology, renal and endocrine pathology, skeletal, male and female reproductive pathology, endocrine systems, the skin, bones and joints, muscles and the nervous system. The second component of the course is the study of pharmacology and diagnostic testing. Students will be able to define adverse reaction to drugs, interactions, and contraindications. Attachment IV Differentiation among drug names, generic names, trade names, and chemical names are discussed. Students are able to identify drugs according to body systems. Classes of drugs that will be covered in this class are: Adrenergic drugs affecting the neurological system, Psychiatric drugs, anticonvulsants and antiparkinsonism drugs, anesthetic drugs, anaglesics and antagonistic drugs, antihistamines, Bronchodilators, Antineoplastic Drugs, Cardiovascular Drugs, Musculoskeletal and Anti-inflammatory Drugs, antihypertensive drugs, antidiabetic drugs, antibacterial drugs, anti-infective drugs, and diuretics. The laboratory component allows students to reinforce didactic content.

This course prepares the students for working as a medical biller. Students learn the medical and ethical concepts of billing as well as computer skills necessary to construct a clean claim. Students see the continuum of the entire process from medical coding, medical billing, submission of claims and the appeals process.

This course is a comprehensive study of health information and reimbursement. The health information component of the course includes health record documentation, the electronic health record, healthcare delivery systems, and information technology and systems. Data retrieval, data security and data integrity processes are identified and evaluated. The second focus of the course is on the basic concepts and principles of healthcare reimbursement in healthcare settings and managed care. The current healthcare insurance programs both commercial and government sponsored are described in the context of the United States' health delivery system. Students also learn the management of the revenue cycle. In the laboratory portion of the course, students gain knowledge of and skills in the use of electronic health records. This course requires students to purchase AHIMA Virtual Lab software to complete the laboratory exercises.

The professional practice experience (PPE) is a supervised practical experience in a health information management department in a acute and/or non-acute healthcare facility. The focus of the PPE is to provide the student with practical experience in ICD-10CM/PCS and CPT/HCPCS coding, computerized information systems, billing and reimbursement, and the electronic health record. Students will have supplemental practice through practice exercises to enhance all aspects of coding areas.

Elementary Arabic I is a proficiency-based course designed to develop the linguistic skills necessary for academic, personal, and professional life. The course will develop all four major language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and will also introduce the student to some aspects of Arab cultures. Arabic is the primary language of instruction. Co-requisite: Students must be in Basic Level II or above or ESL Level IV or above

Arabic for Heritage Speakers I is a course designed for students who are familiar with spoken Arabic ('Ammiyya) to develop proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic (Fusha) , the variety of the language that is learned in school. The course is intensive by design, as it combines into one semester all of the material that is taught in two semesters of Basic Arabic. Its focus is on the productive skills (speaking and writing) in Fusha, while simultaneously exposing students to grammar and vocabulary of a high register. Successful completion of this course and its sequel, Arabic for Heritage Speakers II (MLA 112), will permit a student to enroll in Third Year Arabic. Modern Standard Arabic is the primary language of Instruction.

Arabic for Heritage Speakers II is a continuation course that follows Arabic for Heritage Speakers I - MLA 111. The course is designed for students of Arabic descent who are familiar with spoken Arabic ('Ammiyya) to develop proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic (Fusha), the variety of the language that is learned in school. MLA 112, and its predecessor, MLA 111, are intensive by design, as they combine into two semesters all of the material that is taught in four semesters of Basic Arabic. The two courses focus on the productive skills (speaking and writing) in Fusha, while simultaneously exposing students to grammar and vocabulary of a high register. Successful completion of both courses, i.e., MLA 111 and 112, will permit a student to enroll in Third Year Arabic. Modern Standard Arabic is the primary language of Instruction. Attachment IV

Elementary Arabic II is a proficiency-based course designed to continue development of linguistic skills necessary for academic, personal, and professional modes of communication. The course will continue the development of all four major language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and will expose the student to additional aspects of Arab cultures beyond those to which the students were first introduced in Basic Arabic I, the prerequisite to this course. Arabic is the primary language of instruction. Prerequisite: MLA 101

This course introduces students to the French language and culture. Instruction integrates listening, speaking, grammar, and writing skills.

This course is a continuation of Basic French I. Language skills are developed further through intensive practice of listening, speaking, grammar, and writing.

This course provides students with an introduction to the Spanish language and culture through a competency-based approach. Pronunciation and vocabulary are emphasized through guided student interaction with one another and with the instructor. Cultural awareness and grammar are integrated as students progress.

This course is a continuation of Basic Spanish I. Students are encouraged to expand acquired listening, speaking, grammar, reading, and writing skills in Spanish by the use of real-life situations in the classroom. In addition, students are introduced to social customs and attitudes of Spanish-speaking people. NOTE: This course is not open to Spanish speakers.

This course is intended for students who are interested in pursuing a career in one of the health professions or who are already working in a health-related field. In this course, students will be exposed to the terminology needed for basic communication with patients and colleagues in elementary Spanish. No prior knowledge or formal study of the Spanish language is needed.

This course is intended for those students whose first language is Spanish, but who have had little or no formal instruction in the language. The course is appropriate for those who lack the necessary skills to read and/or write Spanish at the level required to be considered literate in the language. If you speak Spanish at home or with your friends, but find that you cannot communicate as well in it as you can in English, and feel more comfortable expressing yourself in the latter, this course is for you. The course is conducted in Spanish.

This course is designed for the fluent or near-fluent speaker of Spanish who needs to develop proficiency in reading and writing. Oral presentations, reading, and numerous written assignments emphasize speaking and writing skills. Attention is given to individual grammatical problems. The course is taught in Spanish.

In this course, students are introduced to the literature of Latin America, from pre-Columbian times to the present. The course proceeds in chronological fashion, and each literacy period and its works are studied within the historical framework in which they were created. All work in this course, from the readings to the assignments, is done in Spanish.

This course is designed to develop an appreciation of music from the Western classical and popular traditions to selected styles from other parts of the world. Students are also introduced to the fundamentals of music theory. NOTE: Students must have a CD player.

Introduction to World Music is a survey of musical traditions found around the world. The course examines the interaction of music with larger cultural and social patterns. MUS 102 includes an introduction to the fundamentals of musical sound and the principles of ethnomusicology.

This course surveys the forms of music associated with the African-American community from the 19th Century to the present ? worksongs, spirituals, gospel, blues, jazz, RandB, soul and hip-hop, among others. The course considers the influence of the music?s African roots and also the role of race in American cultural history.

Introduction to Latin-American Music explores the rich musical diversity of Latin American cultures through observation and discussion of the music, and sociological elements that create and define these distinct genres. The course focuses on the inter-relation of religion, dance, cultural traditions and socio-historical background of Native American, African, Mestizo-Criollo and Iberian- European have on the region's music.

Nursing I6 Credits

This introductory course includes basic nursing concepts and skills. The focus is on wellness. Areas of emphasis will include the profession of nursing, values, communications, nursing process, physical/psychosocial assessment, nutrition, and pharmacodynamics.

Nursing II8 Credits

This course builds on the knowledge and skills learned in the first nursing course. The student will care for patients with simple acute and chronic health alterations. Content will be arranged in physiologic, self-concept, role function, and interdependent modes. Mental health nursing and physical/psychosocial assessment of those experiencing health deviations will be included.

Nursing III9 Credits

This course continues to examine more complex acute care and chronic health alterations. Content will be arranged in physiologic, self-concept, role function, and interdependent modes. The Childbearing Family will also be included. Pharmacology will be integrated throughout the course.

Nursing IV9 Credits

This course focuses on patient in crisis requiring complex nursing care. Content will be arranged in physiologic, self-concept, role function, and interdependent modes. It will include Child Health Nursing. Emphasis will be placed on managing nursing care for multiple patients, delegation and assumption of leadership role. Pharmacology will be integrated throughout the course.

This seminar consists of an analysis of current health trends and issues and their impact on the practice of nursing. Emphasis will be placed on an exploration of contemporary ethical dilemmas, economic and social issues, and concepts related to nursing leadership and the role transaction.

This course is the first of three major courses that are linked to provide in depth study of the basic policies, guidelines, and procedures of providing high quality personal fitness training with emphasis on safety, health, nutrition, and special needs of chronic health conditions, children, women and the aging population. Topics include scientific rationale for integrated training, basic exercise science including functional anatomy, biomechanics and exercise physiology. The cardiovascular system is examined in conjunction with exercise metabolism and bioenergetics. Health risk appraisal enable students to practice pre-activity screenings and fitness decision making Attachment III skills. Students explore the legal responsibilities of this profession and their scope of practice. The development of communication styles and teaching practices lead students to developing trusting relationships with clients. Basic elements of behavioral change and health psychology encourages students to look at all aspects of motivation for exercise, fitness and health changes in their own lives and their clients. Course materials and class activities provide a means for students to develop a commitment to meeting individual needs of all genders, ages, and special needs populations in the realm of personal fitness training. Through class discussions, role playing, case studies, lab experiments and other active learning techniques students acquire the knowledge, attitude, and skills to support and promote a safe, healthy and realistic program for clients who want to see a positive change in their fitness and health.

This course provides students with practical application of current testing procedures and instrumentation used in exercise testing. Students perform and interpret basic measurement protocols for cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, body composition, and blood pressure. Concepts and procedures are introduced through lecture and applied in the laboratory setting. Students learn the principles related to exercise prescription and develop the necessary skills to design and implement training programs. Safeguards and effectiveness for all fitness levels are addressed. This course incorporates American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM), National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), and American Council on Exercise (ACE) curriculum.

The Personal Fitness course prepares students to work as personal fitness trainers to clients of all ages. Students design and practice components of physical fitness to create an appropriate fitness/exercise program that is based on an analysis of the client's needs. Every class session includes essential theory (lecture) and a practical lab application. In the lab session, students gather and then critically analyze the data to tailor the program for the client's specific needs, goals and abilities. Students obtain opportunities to incorporate the newest practical and technical skills into their assessment planning. This course incorporates American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM), National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), and American Council on Exercise (ACE) curriculum.

The internship in Personal Fitness Training affords students the opportunity to learn from personal trainers, exercise scientists, athletic trainers, and owners/managers of fitness studios/gymnasiums, and current industry professionals in various types of fitness programs, including corporate fitness, wellness, and health care facilities. Students gain hands-on experience and develop health and fitness industry knowledge. Students apply their pre-existing knowledge in real-world settings by interacting with clients and professionals. Each setting or placement is unique and individualized. Students complete a minimum of ninety (90) hours in their internship placement. Students receive weekly didactic reviews in preparation for national certification exams.

This course in an introductory course exploring all aspects of the health and fitness industry and the multiple knowledge areas that are required by trainers and managers to run a successful business. Incorporation of health and fitness principles are applied to business practices. Areas included are: the individual trainer, private personal training business; independent club or a chain/franchise group of clubs.

This course introduces students to the nature, history, patterns, and problems of philosophic thought. In addition, students are encouraged to understand philosophy as a means of learning about the world and our place in it.

This course offers an introduction to the history, structure and scriptural doctrines of the major religions of Asia, including Islam, Buddhism and Hinduism.

This course is an inquiry into the origin, meaning, and evolution of the three following monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This goal is accomplished through an analysis of the following basic concepts as they pertain to: the beliefs of these three as concerns the divine; their respective heritages and spiritual practices; and the many forms each of these religions takes within its own nexus (for example, historical alterations). Or put differently, interest is in exploring the way of life, structure, practice, and historical reality of each of these three great monotheistic religions.

This course introduces students to a variety of ethical approaches to moral issues and to general problems involved in moral reasoning. Various controversial contemporary moral problems relating to business, science, law, medicine, and personal relations are examined.

This is an introductory course in calculus-based mechanics. Topics include vector algebra, equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, and kinematics and dynamics of particles and simple rigid body systems. Emphasis is placed on Newton?s laws of motion and conservation principles involving work, energy, and momentum.

Physics I4 Credits

This is the first of a two-course sequence in introductory physics that deals with mechanics. Topics include measurements, vectors, simple kinematics of uniformly accelerating bodies, projectile and circular motion work, energy, power, and simple rotational dynamics.

Provides an introduction to electricity and magnetism. The course starts with electrostatics and culminates with Maxwell?s equations. Topics covered include Coulomb?s laws, the electric and magnetic field, the electrostatic potential, Gauss?s law, Biot-Savart law, Ampere?s law, and Basic DC and AC circuit theory.

The third course of a three-course sequence on introductory engineering physics. Topics covered include vibratory and wave motion in general, interference of mechanical waves and related standing wave patterns, resonance and phenomena of beats, Doppler shift of sound waves, geometrical optics and applications to lens and mirror system, diffraction interference, and polarization of light. Also covered are special relativity, photoelectric effect, Bohr-atom, continuous and discrete spectra, Compton effect, DeBroglie and wave particle duality of matter, wave mechanics modification of classical mechanics, and the nuclear atom. Lab experiments are performed spanning the broad-spectrum of topics discussed in lecture.

Physics II4 Credits

Covers the following topics: simple harmonic motion, wave motion, light and lenses, electric forces and Coulomb?s Law, electric fields, and electromagnetism.

This introductory nursing course presents basic nursing concepts and skills. The focus is on wellness and disease prevention. Using Maslow?s Hierarchy of Needs, concepts basic to physical, psychological, sociocultural, developmental, and spiritual needs are presented. Clinical experiences are provided in varied sites caring for adult and geriatrics clients. These sites include hospitals and nursing homes.

This course builds on the knowledge and skills learned in PNU 101. It will focus on acute health problems that occur in adults causing alterations in basic human needs. Mental health concepts and alterations will also be discussed. Clinical experiences are provided in varied sites.

This Nursing course builds on the knowledge and skills learned in PNU 101 and PNU 102. The course focuses on reproduction, childbearing, and child- rearing families. Clinical experiences are provided in varied clinical sites.

This course builds on the knowledge and skills learned in the first three nursing courses. It will focus on chronic and emergent health problems that occur in adults across the life span and cause alterations in basic human needs. Clinical experiences are provided at varied sites.

This course will focus on current trends and issues that impact nursing practices and health care delivery. Concepts related to role transition will be explored.

Provides an introduction to political theories and methods of politics as a science. The course includes analysis of structures and processes that characterize political behavior and political institutions.

Examines the structure and operations of the American political system, the philosophical principles and theories upon which it rests, and the social forces and pressures operating on it.

This course is an introduction to the structures and functions of state and local government in the United States. The student is exposed to state and local institutions, processes and policies including their powers, organizations, functions and development as well as the interrelationship between the federal, state, and local political jurisdictions.

This course introduces students to the development and contemporary status of international relations and world politics. The course examines the emergence of the modern nation-state system, competing theories and strategies in foreign policy decision making, the great power rivalries between states, including their causes, consequences and implications for the future. Other topics include the status of power politics in the 21st century, terrorism, non-state actors in the global system of politics, the emergence of a global-political economy and the Global South in a world of wealthy nation-states.

This course reviews the psychoanalytic, sociocultural, trait, learning, sociobiological, and existential-humanistic theories of personality. Personality characteristics are emphasized and basic assumptions underlying selective theoretical approaches are examined. Empirical research findings used to support various theoretical paradigms are critically evaluated and real-world applications are explored.

This course is designed to present an overview of psychology. As an introduction to the field, students learn current perspectives and the methods used in psychology today. They become familiar with problems and general findings in the processes of sensation, perception, learning and memory, and consider issues related to language, thought, and intelligence. They focus, too, on understanding the connections between emotions, stress, and health, and examine current theories in developmental, personality, and abnormal psychology. Students are encouraged to apply psychological principles to personal and social concerns.

This course is designed to investigate human development from the prenatal period through adolescence using a life-span approach. The class will focus on the interaction of biological, social, emotional, and cognitive factors as they affect the developing child. Contemporary developmental theories and research issues will be discussed, and emphasis will be placed on the applications of theory to parenting, education, and therapy.

This course offers students majoring in the field or those interested in further study of psychology an opportunity to familiarize themselves with theories within selected areas of scientific psychology (Interpersonal and Social relations, Sensation, Perception, Emotions, Motivation, Intelligence, Personality Assessment, Psychological Disorders and Therapies).

Lifespan Development investigates current theories related to the changes that occur from the prenatal period through old age. Emphasis is placed on understanding the complex interactions of biological, cognitive, social and emotional factors that shape the life course. Students will be expected to apply developmental theories to their own life experiences.

This course is intended primarily for students majoring in education or interested in the learning process. Psychological theories related to development, learning, cognition and motivation will be reviewed and applied to an understanding of student characteristics and differences, the importance of classroom environment, and various means of assessment. Emphasis will be placed on the practical implications of psychological theory, a constructivist approach to learning, and the importance of reflective teaching.

This course examines historical views of abnormal behavior and focuses on contemporary causes, classifications and treatments. Major disorders are considered from psychodynamic, cognitive, humanistic, biological and sociocultural perspectives.

Content is designed to provide an overview of the general principles of patient care, ethics and medico-legal standards. Principles of mathematical formulas, prime factors and electromagnetic energy are introduced. Equipment operation introduces the use of grids, screens, darkroom and digital imaging processing, and all components involved in image production. The foundation of radiation protection and safety standards in radiographic imaging is emphasized. The history of radiography, career opportunities and human diversity and its relationship in the health care system are covered. Learning the basics of medical terminology for use in the health care environment is given.

In this first course, anatomy and positioning terminology and their procedure protocols for chest, abdomen, and upper extremity are presented. Demonstration of applicable factors and radiation protection methods are learned in order to achieve quality radiographs while providing compassionate and optimum patient care. Clinical lab experience will complement didactic instruction. Pre/Co-requisite: RAD 101

This course builds upon the foundation of image production identifying the prime components of radiographic image quality and its control. Image processing for screen -film versus digital imaging along with radiographic accessories for routine diagnostic radiography are analyzed. Radiation protection and biology discuss radiation interaction with atoms and cellular structures. Patient care methodologies are continued emphasizing imaging techniques for mobile, OR and trauma patients including age specific routines. Quality management will include theory and application of basic quality control tests of radiographic equipment. Pre/Co-requisites: RAD 101; RAD 104; 105

In this second course of imaging series, anatomy and positioning terminology and their procedure protocols for lower extremity, shoulder and pelvic girdles, ribs and sternum as well as pediatric and geriatric methodologies are learned. Patient care protocols are always emphasized. Clinical lab experience will complement didactic instruction. Pre/Co-requisites: RAD 101; 102; 104

Biological Aspects of Radiation, personnel protection and minimizing patient exposure are studied in depth. Patient Care introduces the relationship of pharmacology to contrast media studies along with learning venipuncture technique and patient assessment skills. Advanced modalities and special studies will prepare students for senior year clinical rotations. Pre/Co-requisites: RAD 101; 102; 104; 105; 106

In this third course of imaging series, anatomy and positioning terminology and their procedure protocols for the entire spinal column are presented. Patient care protocols are always emphasized. Clinical lab experience will compliment didactic instruction. Pre/Co-requisites: RAD 101; 102; 103

This course is a continuation of RAD-101, -102, and -103. Discussion centers on advanced principles of digital radiography along with an introduction to digital peripheral equipment. Lecture topics include the use of digital equipment for routine fluoroscopy imaging, quality management including continuous quality improvement, and quality assurance. Radiographic Pathology introduces the concepts of diseases and etiology related to radiographic imaging. Students create an oral presentation demonstrating their understanding of image production, equipment, evaluation, and pathology. Pre/Co-requisites: RAD 101; 102; 103; 104; 105;106; 207

In this last course of imaging series, anatomy and positioning terminology and their procedure protocols for contrast studies, skull, and advanced studies such as Myelography, Arthrography and ERCP are learned. Patient care protocols are always emphasized. Clinical lab experience will complement didactic experience. Pre/Co-requisites: RAD 101; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106 ; 204

This course is a review of content covered in RAD- 101, -102, -103, -104, -105, -106, -204, and -207. This course covers in detail the content covered in previous courses such as digital radiography, construction of circuit tubes, comparison of atomic interactions, and the effect on exposure when as low as reasonably achievable and principles of exposure incorporating technical factor conversions for the control panel. Students gain an understanding of the relationship of patient body habitus and patient dosage. The course also reviews content previously covered in Radiographic Imaging courses. Students begin studying for their certification exams through the Online American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) review programs. Pre: RAD 101; 102; 103; 104; 106; 204; 207

A general comprehensive review of all learned material prepares the student for the upcoming ARRT national registry examination. Content Specifications, test taking preparation, and continuing education opportunities will be discussed. Students will be required to pass mock simulated registry exams and comprehensive tests by the required 80% grade in order to pass this final course in order to graduate.

This course offers practical application of reading skills. Working with a variety of written texts, students learn to use reference materials to find information, locate central ideas and supporting details, and develop vocabulary through the use of context clues and word parts. Students also learn to apply annotating, note taking, and summarizing skills.

This course is designed for students who need to develop reading skills before attempting college-level coursework. Students are encouraged to become active readers, listeners and thinkers through a variety of reading and study experiences. Assistance is given with comprehending, summarizing, analyzing, and evaluating assigned readings, including full-length works of fiction or non-fiction.

This course is designed for students who need to improve reading skills before attempting a full college-level schedule. Students develop their skill in comprehending, summarizing, analyzing and evaluating assigned readings, including full-length works of fiction or non-fiction.

This course is designed for students who need preparatory work in reading before attempting a full college-level program. Students refine test-taking and study skills and develop comprehension through reading of college-level essays, textbook materials and novels and/or non-fiction books.

This course is designed for students needing preparatory instruction before entering ENG/RDG 071 and RDG 075. It offers practical application of study skills by using a variety of written materials. Students will learn to identify central ideas, supporting details, and to imply meaning from the text. In addition, they will apply annotating, note taking and summarizing skills in various content area materials. Vocabulary development will be an important component of instruction in this course.

Focuses on analytical reading skills. Students are taught to identify logical patterns of thought in formal written and spoken language. Practice is provided in reading maps and graphs; analyzing and solving word problems; and understanding analogies, making inferences, and drawing conclusions.

Introduction to Science in the Real World

This course is for students who have not had high school physics and for those who wish to review the subject. It covers mechanics, electricity and magnetism, elements of heat, work, and waves. The associated laboratory supplements and illustrates the principles discussed in class.

This course defines the concept of a supply chain and all of its components from raw materials extracted from the earth to retail products ready for purchase by consumers. The principles learned in this track provide the necessary foundation for fully comprehending the following certification tracks. Supply Chain Management Principles assures success in the remaining certification SCM tracks and is recommended as a prerequisite to other certification tracks. The Supply Chain Management Principles certification also stands alone as a high level overview of supply chain management.

Transportation Operations explains in detail the different types of transportation modes: air, water, rail, and pipeline used throughout the supply chain and reasons for selected modes. Transportation Operations looks at cost drivers such as dimension, weight and speed along with delivery requirements and other special requirements as input to key transportation decisions.

Warehousing Distribution introduces the student to the processes, software, and terminology used in modern distribution operations. This course trains students on the basics of warehousing so that they may quickly acclimate themselves and be effective contributors in warehousing and distribution operations. Discussion centers on the role of warehousing regarding facility configuration, storage and handling techniques, performance metrics, customer service considerations, and safety concerns across various types of distribution facilities.

This course focuses on the origins, theoretical and philosophical foundations, and practical issues associated with education and intervention services for children birth through eight years of age. This unique group may have disabilities, or may be developmentally delayed, or at risk for problems in learning. Topics include issues related to public laws, effectiveness of early intervention, biological and environmental influences on development, definitions of "at-risk" and "disabled" populations and assessment. Students will gain knowledge in curriculum design and strategies for teaching young children with special needs in collaboration with their families. Students will gain practical experience via field assignments. They are expected to complete observations of young children with special needs in various settings, as well as implement an extensive case study.

An introduction to the field of special education, the etiology, societal attitudes, federal and state laws, and responsibility of educators will be explored. Emphasis will be on the exceptional child as a learner by developing an understanding of the handicapping conditions and applying modifications to educational practices and environments. Current programs and services for educating exceptional children in the State of New Jersey will be discussed.

This course focuses on the interactions between the natural environment, social organizations, and social behavior, with studies of the social factors that cause environmental problems, the societal impacts of those problems, and societal efforts to solve these problems. The course explores issues of science and technology, popular culture, economics, urbanization, racial and gender relations, as well as social movements. This course develops a broad understanding of society and environmental issues.

This course is an introduction to the major concepts, theories, methods and findings in the field of sociology. It deals with the structure and functioning of society, major social institutions, and such social processes as conflict and change.

This course examines the aging process and problems of aged people. The biological, psychological and sociological dimensions of aging are explored. Implications for social policy will be addressed.

This course examines the family as a social institution and explores its functions, structure, structure and change. The family in a multicultural environment is examined and a comparative approach is applied. Challenges of modern times are addressed.

This course examines the dysfunctions and contradictions in social institutions, structures and processes. The role of power in social and individual problems is emphasized.

The course examines the diversity of world religions and their structure and functions from the sociological perspectives. The role of religion in pluralistic societies will be explored. The conflicting trends of fundamentalism and secularization will also be addressed.

Criminology3 Credits

This course covers historical and contemporary as well as philosophical and scientific approaches to the understanding of criminal behavior. Medical, psychological, political, economic and sociological dimensions will be explored. Crime statistics are also examined.

This course examines the structure, functions, and conflicts associated with race and ethnic relations, and the interaction between minority and majority groups. Emphasis is placed on the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, class and religion and its impact on racial/ethnic identities. Historical and contemporary experiences of various racial/ethnic groups will be explored and various sociological perspectives will be applied. Race and ethnic relations will be explored from both the national (U.S.) and the global perspectives.

This course offers an introduction to the main concepts and methods of social research. It is designed to develop an understanding of scientific methods of inquiry. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are covered. Students gain expertise in report writing. Creative and critical thinking skills are also emphasized.

Acting II3 Credits

Acting II is an intermediate level acting course that delves more intensely into scene work, and builds upon the basic skills acquired in Intro to Acting. The curriculum focuses primarily on the foundations of Stanislavski's Method, but also emphasizes two offshoots of his concepts - the distinctive acting styles of both Stella Adler and Sanford Meisner. By concentrating on objectives, given circumstances, sensory work, affective memories, characterization, and moment-to-moment work, students will acquire the discipline and framework necessary to create a theatrical performance.

Contemporary Drama focuses on late 20th - 21st Century plays, and the analysis of their theatrical structures from the perspective of theatre artists - playwrights, actors, directors, and designers. The emphasis of the course is to develop the student's ability to appreciate the intellectual and intuitive work required to create a theatrical experience from a written text in today's theatre.

Introduction to Playwriting is designed to create a supportive and stimulating environment for student playwrights to develop the essential tools necessary to craft plays. The art of playwriting is explored through analytic as well as creative work, including the use of writing prompts, play analysis, re-writing exercises, and play readings. The study and practice of these fundamental playwriting techniques culminate in the writing of a 10-minute play.

The course is designed for the college student possessing little or no background in the performing arts, and for experienced performers who wish to brush up on their skills. Course content includes beginning technique, theory, and the methodology needed to grasp the concept of acting. The practice of acting is explored through exercises using imagination, concentration, relaxation, intention, improvisation, spontaneity, and the reality of doing (as each applies to the craft of acting).

Introduction to Theatre explores the fundamentals of the theatre by bringing to the forefront the work of the theatre practitioners -- playwrights, actors, directors and designers -- working in the world theatre today. The course will also examine the social, political, and artistic forces that shape a play in relation to culture and history.

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